Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Any aortic valve replacement , surgical or minimally invasive , carries a degree of risk. That’s why such interventions are generally reserved for later stages of the disease. [Full Story]
Any aortic valve replacement , surgical or minimally invasive , carries a degree of risk. That’s why such interventions are generally reserved for later stages of the disease. [Full Story]
British researchers found that losing just 10 percent of your body weight during the first five years of Type 2 diabetes can lead to remission. [Full Story]
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Before agreeing to a procedure, make sure you actually need it and there are no suitable alternatives [Full Story]
A hospital is not a place where you should be left to fend for yourself. You are at a disadvantage. [Full Story]
Although the mechanism of the connection is not well understood, we do know that people with diabetes face a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. [Full Story]
Two types of abnormal lesions are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease: beta amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. [Full Story]

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