Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Heart failure is a major killer in the United States, taking some 610,000 lives a year. Unfortunately, breakthroughs in the treatment of heart failure are few and far between. [Full Story]
Heart failure is a major killer in the United States, taking some 610,000 lives a year. Unfortunately, breakthroughs in the treatment of heart failure are few and far between. [Full Story]
Here are some tips for people with heart valve disease. They are also applicable if you’ve had the situation addressed through replacement or repair. [Full Story]
If you’ve already suffered a heart attack or have other forms of heart disease, stress reduction is a critically important part of any therapy. [Full Story]
Coenzyme Q10, which is found in each of your body’s cells, plays a pivotal role in heart health. [Full Story]
Not that long ago, any plaque buildup in the coronary arteries was considered dangerous, and it was thought that larger areas of plaque were more risky. [Full Story]
Because vehicular exhaust is a key cause of air pollution, people with heart disease or those at high risk for it should avoid rush hour traffic. [Full Story]
It’s believed that about 25 percent of the population is resistant to the blood-thinning effects of aspirin. [Full Story]
For a recent study, researchers at the University of Freiburg in Germany examined whether thinking positively about exercise could enhance its effect on well-being. [Full Story]
Because so much of heart disease is considered inherited, a genetic test is the key to all sorts of predictions. [Full Story]

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