Tags: public schools | republicans | big cities

Public School Advocacy Key to Reviving Urban GOP

the words schools closed written on a blackboard
(Dreamstime)

By Friday, 05 March 2021 01:44 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Violent crime is skyrocketing across big cities in the United States. This sad phenomenon will likely help Republicans perform better in municipal elections than they usually do.

Hundreds of Republican candidates across the country will highlight crime with a laserlike focus and they certainly should. However, most of these same Republican candidates will only focus on crime (some will sprinkle in the usual platitudes about cutting taxes) and most of them will be trounced at the polls in urban areas.

Of course, many of these candidates will be able to spend the next few years bragging about how well they did in Democratic strongholds, some will also boast about doubling the GOP vote total — usually meaning they went from 10% to 20%. Republicans running in big cities won't win by just talking about rising crime. They must focus on making a quality public school education available to all our children.

Just like Republican candidates won big city elections in the '80s and '90s by promising to take on the defenders of the crime lords, Republicans must now promise to fight the nefarious bureaucrats whose stranglehold on public education policy in big cities has wreaked havoc on families across the United States.

Big City Republican candidates who step out of their comfort zone of talking about one issue may find themselves in the highly unusual position of staffing their administrations after winning elections in urban areas.

Most teachers in big cities are hardworking, highly qualified individuals motivated by performing a public service in educating our youth; our educational crisis has nothing to do with teachers or students, the problem is that too many of our elected officials and education administrators could not care any less about what teachers and students really need.

There is no more glaring and devastating illustration of this than using COVID as a pretext to keep our public schools closed for almost a year. This disastrous policy is a scandal that will be studied and analyzed by students of public administration for decades to come.

Most teachers never supported the ridiculous idea of "remote learning" and wanted to return to the classroom. Of course, fat cat bureaucrats and their political benefactors were far more concerned about their tanning time at fancy resorts than working on reopening our classrooms. School districts all over the country have literally lost track of thousands of students who haven't checked in to remote learning at all.

Students from lower income households shouldn't be denied an education because they can't afford access to blazing fast internet. The school closings in big cities also disproportionately harm families with lower incomes as well as immigrants and minorities.

The message for Republican candidates is simple: "Never again should parents have to choose between putting food on the table or making sure their children get an education." "Children worrying about going to school and getting assaulted, robbed, or harassed should be an ugly relic of the past."

Republicans have a golden opportunity to connect strongly with voters who just a year would laugh at the notion of voting for them. Candidates must become ferocious advocates for students whose parents cannot afford private tutors, the fastest most reliable internet service, and the most expensive tech gadgets on the market.

They must speak up for parents who can't afford to efficiently "uber" it between every tutoring appointment, who can't work remotely at will, or just take a "personal day" to make new arrangements for their children's educational instruction every time schools are canceled again.

Candidates must become a powerful voice for the weakest in our society, children who want to learn but have been sidelined and marginalized by unaccountable bureaucrats. How many would be future doctors, teachers and scientists are being canceled because no one will fight for their rights to go to school?

Dr. Ben Carson, one of our country's preeminent pediatric neurosurgeons, grew up under financially challenging circumstances while attending public schools. A giant in jurisprudence, the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg also grew up under limited financial means, but attended public school, and the rest is history.

"Education is the great equalizer." You've probably heard or read this profound statement more than once in your lifetime. Horace Mann spoke these words while addressing the Massachusetts Board of Education in 1848.

"Education, then, beyond all other devices of human origin, is the great equalizer of the conditions of men — the balance wheel of the social machinery," said Mann.

Republican candidates who often ridiculed for running in urban districts can have the last laugh if they run on the principle that a free public school education is a basic right that should be available to all children regardless of their zip code.

Nicholas Chamberas has advised good government advocacy groups, elected officials, and political candidates on public policy matters as well as having served as a senior adviser on several prominent New York City campaigns. He holds a degree in Political Science and a Juris Doctor. Read Nicholas Chamberas Reports More Here.

© 2021 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


NicholasChamberas
Big City Republican candidates who step out of their comfort zone of talking about one issue may find themselves in the highly unusual position of staffing their administrations after winning elections in urban areas.
public schools, republicans, big cities
837
2021-44-05
Friday, 05 March 2021 01:44 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved