Tags: Donald Trump | atlantic | jeffreygoldberg | trump | france

Jeffrey Goldberg's Defamatory Reporting About Trump's Visit to France

trump standing in the rain making a speech with the eiffel tower in the background
President Donald Trump delivers a speech during a ceremony at the American Cemetery of Suresnes, outside Paris, on November 11, 2018. (AFP via Getty Images)
 

By Tuesday, 08 September 2020 08:21 AM Current | Bio | Archive

The opening paragraphs of Jeffrey Goldberg's "Trump: Americans Who Died in War Are 'Losers' and 'Suckers,'" disseminate four major falsehoods about the president's visit to France in Nov. 2018, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended World War I. In his defamatory article on Sept. 3, Goldberg falsely accused President Donald Trump of refusing to visit the Aisne-Marne American Military "because he did not believe it important to honor American war dead."

The editor-in-chief of the Atlantic Magazine also tendentiously claimed that President Trump disparaged the "more than 1,800 Marines [buried there] who lost their lives at the Battle of Belleau Wood as "'suckers' for getting killed."

In fact, on Nov. 11, 2018, one day after inclement weather forced the cancellation of his 60-mile helicopter visit to the Aisne-Marne Cemetery, President Trump delivered a very moving speech, in the pouring rain, at the Suresnes American Military Cemetery, five miles from the center of Paris, in which he praised the Marines who fought and died at Belleau Wood in June 1918:

"Here on the revered grounds of the Suresnes American Cemetery lie more than 1,500 service members who made the ultimate sacrifice in the First World War. Among those buried here are legendary Marines who fought in the Battle of Belleau Wood.

"In that treacherous forest and the surrounding fields, American Marines, soldiers and Allied Forces fought – and they fought through hell – to turn the tide of the war. And that's what they did – they turned the tide of the war.

"It was in that battle that our Marines earned the nickname 'Devil Dogs,' arising from the German description of their ferocious fighting spirit. John Kelly knows that name, 'Devil Dogs,' very well. John. Right?"

The president was addressing his chief of staff and retired Marine Gen. John Kelly, and he also recognized and thanked, at the first World War I American cemetery consecrated in France, other prominent American military leaders: Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Gen. Mark Milley, Army Chief of Staff; Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti, Supreme Allied Commander Europe; and Gen. Tod Wolters, Air Force Commander Europe.

President Trump also introduced at this memorial service at the Suresnes Cemetery 10 members of Congress: Ralph Abraham, Anthony Brown, John Carter, Paul Cook, Henry Cuellar, Richard Hudson, Bill Huizenga, Dutch Ruppersberger, John Rutherford and Steve Stivers.

The two other egregious lies disseminated in Jeffrey Goldberg's libelous article are:

"But Trump, on that same trip, asked aides, 'Who were the good guys in this war?' He also said that he didn't understand why the United States would intervene on the side of the Allies."

In reality, as these two other eloquent excerpts from President Trump's speech on Nov. 11, 2018 demonstrate, he is well aware of why 4.7 million Americans, including my maternal grandfather David Schneiderman (1892-1973) and his brother Reuben (1895-1990), served so honorably in the Great War, and why 116,516 made the ultimate sacrifice:

"Each of these marble crosses and Stars of David marks the life of an American warrior – great, great warriors they are – who gave everything for family, country, God and freedom. Through rain, hail, snow, mud, poisonous gas, bullets and mortar, they held the line and pushed onward to victory – it was a great, great victory; costly victory but a great victory – never knowing if they would ever again see their families or ever again hold their loved one."

President Trump then saluted two of these fallen heroes: Marine Sgt. Eugene Wear from Hazelton, Pennsylvania, who survived the Battle of Belleau Wood, but who was mortally wounded several months later and who "passed away one day after Christmas,"; and Sgt. Paul Maynard, who was killed in action on Nov. 11, 1918,"in the final hours of battle, just before the end."

President Donald Trump concluded his speech at the Suresnes American Military Cemetery, where President Woodrow Wilson spoke on Memorial Day in May 1919, with these stirring words:

"The American and French patriots of World War I embody the timeless virtues of our two republics: honor and courage; strength and valor; love and loyalty; grace and glory. It is our duty to preserve the civilization they defended and to protect the peace they so nobly gave their lives to secure one century ago."

Finally, I urge my fellow Americans to watch President Trump's speech, which is preserved on C-Span, and to recognize that the "Nefariously Fake Liberal Journalists," including Jeffrey Goldberg and thousands of others, will resort to the basest calumnies in order to defeat President Trump on Nov. 3. But they will fail as miserably as they did four years ago.

Mark Schulte is a retired New City schoolteacher and mathematician who has written extensively about science and the history of science. Read Mark Schulte's Report's — More Here.

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The opening paragraphs of Jeffrey Goldberg's "Trump: Americans Who Died in War Are 'Losers' and 'Suckers,'" disseminate four major falsehoods about the president's visit to France in Nov. 2018, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended World War I.
atlantic, jeffreygoldberg, trump, france
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2020-21-08
Tuesday, 08 September 2020 08:21 AM
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