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Tags: powers | voting
OPINION

Students' Votes Can Make a Difference, Let's Guide Them

Students' Votes Can Make a Difference, Let's Guide Them

(Jinlide/Dreamstime.com)

Kent Ingle By Monday, 22 January 2024 10:33 AM EST Current | Bio | Archive

Political signs are once again populating front yards, indicating that the presidential election is right around the corner.

The year kicked off with a record-setting win for former President Donald Trump in the Iowa caucus.

Many Republicans now look to the New Hampshire primary to see if the former president will hold his lead on Jan. 23.

The presidential election is bound to shape this year’s news — dominating headlines with voters’ concerns and candidates’ promises.

While many anticipate the November election, it’s a year that will remind us why every vote counts.

If we learned anything from the 2020 election season, it’s that college students’ votes can make a difference.

A record high of 66% of college students turned out to vote during the 2020 presidential election. This represented a 14% increase from the 2016 election and outpaced the national average of all American voters.

Yet, Generation Z (the generation many college students fall under) is losing faith in government and politics. Only 20% believe that elected officials will create positive change.

It’s time we help college students realize the importance of their civic duty to vote.

Here are key reasons they should be encouraged to register to vote and cast their ballot on Tues. Nov. 5.

Let Their Voice Be Heard

Research continues to show that Gen Z stands up against social injustice, protests climate change and wants to impact their communities.

Voting puts your child one step closer to being a part of the change they want to see.

Their vote can help determine the next president, congressional members, governors and local government officials.

These individuals will put forth legislation that aligns (or is contrary) with your child’s values and beliefs.

Encourage your child to research every candidate on the ballot and determine those individuals’ top priorities.

And, yes, every vote counts. There are several instances in history where seats were determined by one vote.

In the 2016 election, a Vermont state seat was determined by one vote, and a New Mexico state House seat was determined by two votes.

Their ballot can make a difference in America’s future.

Influence Future Legislation

In November, the presidential seat is up for grabs, along with all the House of Representatives’ seats and over one-third of the Senate.

Why is this important? Congress has the power to enact legislation and declare war which is granted by Article I of the Constitution.

If your student wants to make a difference in current laws or proposed legislation, they must vote for representatives in favor of those bills.

Although the president has the power to approve and veto bills, Congress can vote to override the veto.

Currently, Republicans hold the majority in the House of Representatives and Democrats hold a majority in the Senate.

For legislation to pass, it needs to pass in both the House and the Senate before the president signs it into law.

Encourage your child to research what types of bills have passed and which ones haven’t. Once they do, they will recognize how the party in control of the House and Senate can affect which bills become law

Shape Politics in Their State

Your student's votes can make a difference in how their state is led.

In this upcoming election, there are 11 gubernatorial races (state governor elections).

These are leaders who can make decisions that impact their everyday life.

The governors are responsible for implementing state laws and overseeing the operation of the state executive branch.

The 10th Amendment says, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people."

When the pandemic hit, governors took different approaches to deal with the crisis. Think back to how some states had tighter lockdown restrictions.

Governors even took stances that opposed the president. Keep in mind that no federal statutes give the president the power to override state decisions.

Ballots also include amendments to state constitutional laws, statewide offices, district courts of appeal, public school board seats and county seats.

Your child should take the time to read through those proposals, analyze the candidates and decide whether they will vote in favor of the amendments.

Your student's vote can make a difference in the way our nation is led and the bills that are put into law these next four years.

Encourage them to register to vote, if they haven’t done so already, and to research who and what is on the ballot.

Help them explore what candidates are likely to vote in favor of and take it a step further to find their voting records.

One of the best ways your child can stand up for what they believe in and for the future of our democracy is by employing their civic duty of voting.

Dr. Kent Ingle serves as the president of Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida, one of the fastest growing private universities in the nation. A champion of innovative educational design, Ingle is the author of "Framework Leadership.'' Read Kent Ingle's Reports — More Here.

© 2024 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


KentIngle
The presidential election is bound to shape this year’s news, dominating headlines with voters’ concerns and candidates’ promises. While many anticipate the November election, it’s a year that will remind us why every vote counts.
powers, voting
847
2024-33-22
Monday, 22 January 2024 10:33 AM
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