Tags: Emerging Threats | Presidential History | declaration | independence | jefferson

How About We all Say What We Want and Govt Leaves Us Alone?

first amendment big tech

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By Wednesday, 20 January 2021 05:24 PM Current | Bio | Archive

When Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, he included in it a list of the colonists' grievances with the British government.

Notably absent were any complaints that the British government infringed upon the freedom of speech.

In those days, public speech was as acerbic as it is today.

If words were aimed at Parliament, all words were lawful. If they were aimed directly and personally at the king — as Jefferson's were in the Declaration — they constituted treason.

Needless to say, Jefferson and the 55 others who signed the Declaration would all have been hanged for treasonous speech had the British prevailed.

Of course, the colonists won the war, and, six years afterward, the 13 states ratified the Constitution. Two years after ratification, the Constitution was amended by adding the Bill of Rights.

The first ratified amendment prohibited Congress from doing what the colonists never seriously complained about the British government doing — infringing upon the freedom of speech.

James Madison, who drafted the Bill of Rights, insisted upon referring to speech as "the" freedom of speech to emphasize that it preexisted the government.

If you could have asked Madison where he believed the freedom of speech came from, he'd have said it was one of the inalienable rights Jefferson wrote about in the Declaration.

Stated differently, each of the signatories of the Declaration and ratifiers of the Bill of Rights manifested in writing their unambiguous belief that the freedom of speech is a natural right — personal to every human.

It does not come from the government.

It comes from within and cannot be taken away by legislation or executive command.

Yet, a mere seven years later, during the presidency of John Adams, Congress enacted the Alien and Sedition Acts, which punished speech critical of the government.

So, how could the same generation — in some cases the same human beings — that prohibited congressional infringement upon speech have enacted a statute that punished speech?

To some of the Framers — the Federalists who wanted a big government as we have today— infringing upon the freedom of speech meant silencing it before it was uttered.

Today, this is called prior restraint, and the Supreme Court has essentially outlawed it.

To the antifederalists — or Democratic-Republicans, as they called themselves — the First Amendment prohibited Congress from interfering with or punishing any speech.

Adams' Department of Justice indicted, prosecuted and convicted antifederalists for their public speech critical of the government.

When Jefferson won the presidency and the antifederalists won control of Congress, the Federalists repealed the speech suppression parts of the Alien and Sedition Acts on the eve of their departure from congressional control, lest it be used against them.

During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln locked up hundreds of journalists in the North who were critical of his war efforts.

During World War I, President Woodrow Wilson — whom my alma mater, Princeton University, is trying to erase from its memory — arrested folks for reading the Declaration of Independence aloud and singing German beer hall songs.

Lincoln argued that preserving the Union was more important than preserving the First Amendment, and Wilson argued that the First Amendment only restrained Congress, not the president.

Both arguments have since been rejected by the courts.

In the 1950s, the feds successfully prosecuted Cold War dissenters on the theory that their speech was dangerous and might have a tendency to violence.

Some of the victims of this torturous rationale died in prison.

The government's respect for speech has waxed and waned.

It is at its lowest ebb during wartime. Of course, dissent during wartime — which challenges the government's use of force to kill — is often the most important speech.

The speech we love needs no protection. The speech we hate does.

The government has no authority to evaluate speech.

As the Framers understood, all people have a natural right to think as we wish and to say and publish whatever we think.

Even hateful, hurtful and harmful speech is protected speech.

Yet, in perilous times, such as the present, we have seen efforts to use the courts to block the publication of unflattering books.

We have seen state governors use the police to protect gatherings of protestors with whose message they agreed and to disburse critical protestors.

We have seen mobs silence speakers while the police did nothing.

And in perilous times, such as the present, we have seen Big Tech companies silencing their opponents. I hate when they do that, but they have every right to do so.

They own the bulletin board. Twitter and Facebook can ban any speech they want because they are not the government. And the First Amendment only restrains the government.

In the constitutional sense, free speech means only one thing — free from government interference.

Punishing speech is the most dangerous business because there will be no end.

The remedy for hateful or threatening speech is not silence or punishments; it is more speech — speech that challenges the speaker.

Why do government officials want to silence their opponents?

They fear an undermining of their power.

The dissenters might make more appealing arguments than they do. St. Augustine taught that nearly all in government want to tell others how to live.

How about we all say whatever we want and the government leaves us alone?

Judge Andrew P. Napolitano, a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Notre Dame Law School, was the youngest life-tenured Superior Court judge in the history of New Jersey. He sat on the bench from 1987 to 1995. He taught constitutional law at Seton Hall Law School for 11 years, and he returned to private practice in 1995. Judge Napolitano began television work in the same year. He is Fox News’ senior judicial analyst on the Fox News Channel and the Fox Business Network. He is the host of ''Freedom Watch'' on the Fox Business Network. Napolitano also lectures nationally on the U.S. Constitution, the rule of law, civil liberties in wartime, and human freedom. He has been published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and numerous other publications. He is the author of five books on the U.S. Constitution. Read Judge Andrew P. Napolitano's Reports — More Here.

© Creators Syndicate Inc.


   
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Why do government officials want to silence their opponents? They fear an undermining of their power. The dissenters might make more appealing arguments than they do.
declaration, independence, jefferson
1038
2021-24-20
Wednesday, 20 January 2021 05:24 PM
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