Tags: roy moore | jeff session | senate | alabama

Controversial Former Judge Roy Moore Favored for Ala. Senate Seat

Image: Controversial Former Judge Roy Moore Favored for Ala. Senate Seat
(AP)

By
Wednesday, 16 August 2017 10:01 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Less than a year after Roy Moore’s fellow jurists removed him as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court for encouraging local officials to defy the Supreme Court’s ruling permitting same-sex marriage, Moore is favored to win in the Senate runoff over Luther Strange.

In topping the Republican U.S. Senate primary over eight opponents, Moore rolled up 40 percent of the vote to 30 percent for incumbent, U.S. Sen. Luther Strange. Having carried all but four of the state’s 67 counties, Moore is now the favorite to defeat Strange (who was appointed to succeed Attorney General Jeff Sessions in February) in the runoff on Sept. 26.

“He almost won tonight and most likely will win the runoff,” Shaun McCutcheon, longtime Alabama GOP activist and early Trump backer, told Newsmax. “That’s because the run-off vote from candidates who were eliminated — especially [conservative Rep. and third-place finisher] Mo Brooks and [State Sen. And fourth-place finisher] Trip Pittman — will likely split in his favor since they were very conservative candidates. That that puts him easily over 50 percent.”

Perhaps sensing a Moore victory in the works next month, former two-term Gov. Fob James, who is not close to the chief justice, endorsed Moore on Wednesday morning. Also weighing in for Moore was James’ son, former gubernatorial candidate Tim James.

“Incredible” is the only way to describe Moore’s political comeback at age 70. He was ousted as chief justice for the first time in 2003 for refusing to remove a monument containing the Ten Commandments in the Alabama Hall of Justice. In 2012, he won back Alabama’s highest judicial office, only to be ousted again last year for encouraging local officials to ignore the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling permitting same-sex marriage.

"Even [segregationist Gov.]Wallace ended his defiance of federal officials when courts ruled he had to stand down,” former Alabama State Republican Chairman Marty Conners told me. “Judge Moore never gave up in his defiance, even after his colleagues ordered him to."

Conners pointed out to us that what he called “a ridiculously low turnout” works in favor of the controversial Moore.

“The turnout was 15 to 18 percent, so Judge Moore’s followers feel strongly about him, they make sure they vote, and they have a much stronger impact than usual,” added Conners, who noted that the turnout in the primaries is normally “about 35 percent.”

Having twice been elected chief justice and lost two Republican primary bids for governor, Moore is almost universally known by Alabama voters.

Considered a strong conservative, Moore avoided specific discussion on most issues and instead campaigned as a “constitutional conservative” and proven champion of the “word of God.”

The national press made considerable news out of the fact that Strange was backed by President Trump through Twitter and in TV spots. Moore countered that he was also a supporter of Trump’s agenda but that the President did not sense the mood in Alabama when he backed Strange.

Strange, a former state attorney general, has voted the conservative line on healthcare, immigration, and other key issues. But he was widely perceived as an “establishment” Republican more than a grass-roots conservative.

In claiming victory Tuesday, Moore declared “the attempt by the silk-stockinged Washington elitists to control the vote of the people of Alabama has failed.”

Should Moore be nominated next month and win the special election in December, he will be the oldest freshman senator since S.I. Hayakawa, R-Calif., also 70, was elected in 1976.

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

© 2018 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
John-Gizzi
Less than a year after Roy Moore’s fellow jurists removed him as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court for encouraging local officials to defy the Supreme Court’s ruling permitting same-sex marriage, Moore is favored to win in the Senate runoff over Luther Strange.
roy moore, jeff session, senate, alabama
596
2017-01-16
Wednesday, 16 August 2017 10:01 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved