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Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Find out what others are saying about Dr. Blaylock by clicking here.
Tags: spirochetes | bacteria | infection | lyme disease

Spirochetes Increase Brain Inflammation

By Tuesday, 11 May 2021 04:49 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Spirochetes are a type of bacteria that are helical in shape (like corkscrews). They can enter cells, causing chronic infections. Examples of spirochetes include:

• Syphilis

• Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi)

• Periodontal infections (oral periodontal treponema, T. Sokranski, and T. pectinovarum)

Fully 90 percent of Alzheimer’s brains have been shown to contain spirochetes. Lyme disease is one of the fastest growing vector[1]borne infections in the U.S., as well as the rest of the world. It is transmitted by ticks.

In most cases, if it is caught early the disease can be cured. If left untreated, it can become chronic, as occurs in many people.

Lyme disease can invade the brain through the blood, in lymphatics, or along nerve fibers. When it reaches the brain, it infects microglia, leading to chronic smoldering inflammation.

Spirochetes from the gums (periodontal infections) can also cause chronic brain infection that releases very high levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNF alpha. This activates microglia in the brain and can trigger several mechanisms associated with neurodegeneration.

In one large community study, researchers examined people for signs of gum infections, such as bleeding gums, loss of periodontal attachment, and loss of teeth. Using three different methods to measure cognitive function, they found that gum disease was strongly associated with decreased cognitive function in early and late adult life.

Other studies have shown a strong relation between gum infections of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

are a type of bacteria that are helical in shape (like corkscrews). They can enter cells, causing chronic infections. Examples of spirochetes include:

• Syphilis

• Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi)

• Periodontal infections (oral periodontal treponema, T. Sokranski, and T. pectinovarum)

Fully 90 percent of Alzheimer’s brains have been shown to contain spirochetes. Lyme disease is one of the fastest growing vector[1]borne infections in the U.S., as well as the rest of the world. It is transmitted by ticks.

In most cases, if it is caught early the disease can be cured. If left untreated, it can become chronic, as occurs in many people.

Lyme disease can invade the brain through the blood, in lymphatics, or along nerve fibers. When it reaches the brain, it infects microglia, leading to chronic smoldering inflammation.

Spirochetes from the gums (periodontal infections) can also cause chronic brain infection that releases very high levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNF alpha. This activates microglia in the brain and can trigger several mechanisms associated with neurodegeneration.

In one large community study, researchers examined people for signs of gum infections, such as bleeding gums, loss of periodontal attachment, and loss of teeth. Using three different methods to measure cognitive function, they found that gum disease was strongly associated with decreased cognitive function in early and late adult life.

Other studies have shown a strong relation between gum infections of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

© 2021 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Blaylock
Spirochetes are a type of bacteria that are helical in shape (like corkscrews). They can enter cells, causing chronic infections.
spirochetes, bacteria, infection, lyme disease
485
2021-49-11
Tuesday, 11 May 2021 04:49 PM
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