Tags: corpse | flower | denver | smells | rotting | meat

'Corpse Flower' Blooms in Denver; Crowds Flock to Take a Whiff

Image: 'Corpse Flower' Blooms in Denver; Crowds Flock to Take a Whiff
People admire a giant Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanum) at the Jindai botanical gardens in Tokyo on July 22, 2015, after the flower started to bloom on July 21. A similar “corpse flower” bloomed in Denver this week, drawing crowds of people all wanting to catch a whiff of its rotting meat smell. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

By    |   Thursday, 20 Aug 2015 04:08 PM

A "corpse flower" has bloomed for the first time in the Rocky Mountains area, brought to life by the patience of the Denver Botanic Gardens staff who waited 13 years for the rare plant to bloom.

The haunting name of the corpse flower comes from its smell, described as being similar to rotting meat in order to lure insects, Live Science reported. The plant was donated to the botanical gardens in 2007, and it turned 13 this year.

The plant, titan arum, makes up for its lack of a sweet smell with a tremendously large bloom, about eight feet tall, Live Science said.

"The plant's scientific name, Amorphophallus titanum, means ‘giant, misshapen penis,’ hinting at the appearance of this bizarre plant," the website said.

A live video of the plant blooming, provided by KUSA Denver, was posted on YouTube with the tag, "Stinky DBG (Denver Botanic Garden) is officially opening up!" The bloom lasts about 48 hours, and the plant probably won’t bloom again for seven to 10 years.



Thousands of people have been standing in line to see and smell the flower, Live Science said. The scent is mild nearby, but stronger in back of the greenhouse where fans are pulling air into the outdoors.

Everything that makes the corpse flower unusual has also made the plant well-documented by numerous researchers and other gardens. In 2013, the Gustavus Adolphus College created a time-lapse video of a titan arum nicknamed Perry T. Titan, tracking more than 45 days from when the flower first broke the soil to when it died after blooming:



9 News reported people were still lining up to see the flower Thursday morning, even though it had begun to close. During the morning, workers at the botanic garden removed some of the plant’s pollen so other facilities could use it to pollinate their corpse flowers.

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A corpse flower has bloomed for the first time in the Rocky Mountains area, brought to life by the patience of the Denver Botanic Gardens staff who waited 13 years for the rare plant to bloom.
corpse, flower, denver, smells, rotting, meat
312
2015-08-20
Thursday, 20 Aug 2015 04:08 PM
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