Tags: Russia | United Nations | moldova | vladimir putin | crimea | annexation

Will Moldova Be the Next Crimea?

vladimir putin stands and delivers remarks during a speech
Vladimir Putin (Anna Sergeeva/Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 19 June 2019 06:40 PM

After an inconclusive election, a looming political crisis, and a coalition government controlled by a pro-Russia president, Moldova appears to be making the move toward becoming "the next victim of Russia."

This is what the former Speaker of the Moldovan Parliament, Andrian Candu, told Newsmax last week when speaking on the future of the country.

Just days ago, the Democratic Party of Moldova (PDM) conceded their power to the new coalition government that was challenging the PDM. The coalition between the pro-Europe ACUM Party and the pro-Russia Socialist Party (PSRM) is led by Igor Dodon of the PSRM.

Russian President Vladimir Putin himself spoke last week on Russian television about his ardent support of the new government in Chișinău (the capital of Moldova). He stressed the importance of getting rid of the Democratic Party who, he claimed, "usurped power in Moldova."

This claim follows the development of two governments in Moldova: one controlled by the Democratic Party led by Vladimir Plahotniuc and the other controlled by the coalition led by Dondon.

The two governments emerged following an inconclusive election in February. According to the Moldovan constitution, after an election, the members of parliament have three months to establish a coalition and form a new government.

The Democratic Party refused to acknowledge the new coalition, saying it missed the June 7 deadline to form a new government. This charge, which was backed by the constitutional court, led Plahotnuic and the Democratic Party to refuse a concession of power.

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1992, Russia has maintained its military presence in Transnistria, a breakaway region in Moldova. Currently, not a single United Nations member state recognizes Transnistria as a sovereign state.

Russian interference in Moldova has not ended with a military presence. In 2014, Russia threatened the free trade agreement with Moldova encompassed in the Commonwealth of Independent States Free Trade Area (CISFTA), which was signed in 2011. The threats came after Moldova signed an association agreement with the EU.

Currently, Moldova relies solely on Russian oil, Speaker Candu told us. Yet, Romania has gas reserves in the Black Sea, and in a year will have plenty of gas for themselves and enough left over to sell to Moldova.

According to the Speaker and his team, reports have emerged saying Russia has been funding the Socialist Party in Moldova with 36 million USD over a three-year period.

The former Soviet territory – and poorest country in Europe – is at risk to become the next annexation of Russia, which appears more likely with the installation of pro-Russia President Dodon.

Before the concession of the Democratic caretaker government, a solution to the power struggle looked uncertain. The best solution, Candu told Newsmax, would be a "snap" election.

"The ones in power" should be the citizens of Moldova, he said, as they are the country's best option to determining who should lead the country.

(Clare Hillen is a sophomore at George Washington University, and a summer intern at the Washington, D.C. bureau of Newsmax)

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
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Politics
Moldova appears to be making the move toward becoming "the next victim of Russia," according to the former Speaker of the Moldovan Parliament, Newsmax's Clare Hillen reports.
moldova, vladimir putin, crimea, annexation
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2019-40-19
Wednesday, 19 June 2019 06:40 PM
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