Tags: Cincinnati | Education

Schools Must Focus on Priorities, Not Parties

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Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 10:58 AM Current | Bio | Archive

There’s another school eating controversy that’s generating news.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Burlington Elementary School has banned birthday cake, ice cream, or any other type of food from birthday celebrations at the school.

Parent Valerie Bailey, a member of the school’s PTA, explained, “We're finding it's difficult to be the first. Parents say it's not fair. But we hope it sends a message to the parents and kids, especially with the obesity rate being so high, and puts a bug in their ear."

Kathy Reutman, a bureaucrat with the school system, “who is in charge of making sure the wellness policies for Boone County schools meet federal guidelines,” added, “It's not up to us to tell parents what to do. But when children are in our care we make sure that nothing gets in the way of them and their learning.”

Well if that’s the case can someone explain to me why the school allows birthday parties in the first place?

How, exactly, does blowing out candles educate children?

Is it a lesson in combustion, chocolate, or carbon pollution? The never-ending addition of distractions like graduation ceremonies, birthday parties, and wellness education are one of the reasons Johnny can’t read or write.

I completed my elementary school education without ever throwing a birthday party at school, because at that time school was for learning — not celebration and indoctrination.

It says a great deal about the state of education in the United States when the problem is right in front of parents and educrats they are blind to it. In the same story Bailey explained, “Birthday parties were taking up too much class time, she said. Students would bring in large packs of cupcakes, or other sweets that took lots of time to pass out and clean up. Sometimes there would be three such celebrations in a day.

“They (teachers) were struggling with how to manage birthday celebrations. Not that there are always three a day, but it was getting over the top."

I suppose the teachers were fortunate no parent decided to include a moon bounce or face–painting in the happy observance. Cleaning up after one of those mini–festivals can be a real chore.

But of course, no one suggested the obvious solution, which is confine birthday celebrations to the child’s home or places intended to house celebrations like Chuck E. Cheese and let schools concentrate on teaching.

Michael Reagan is the son of President Ronald Reagan. He is president of The Reagan Legacy Foundation and chairman of the League of American Voters. Mike is an in-demand speaker with Premiere. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.

 


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I completed my elementary school education without ever throwing a birthday party at school, because at that time school was for learning — not celebration and indoctrination.
Cincinnati, Education
441
2014-58-15
Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 10:58 AM
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