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Tags: credo | democratic | lottery | schumer | visa

Did Illegal Immigration Backlash Make Dems Fold on Shutdown?

 Did Illegal Immigration Backlash Make Dems Fold on Shutdown?
(Designer491/Dreamstime)

Michael Dorstewitz By Tuesday, 23 January 2018 10:47 AM EST Current | Bio | Archive

The shutdown of the federal government was over almost before it began, giving non-essential federal employees exactly one day off with pay. It also so gave us a new standard to measure future short-term shutdowns.

So what was that all about?

If you ask Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., he will tell you that it’s about doing the right thing for DACA recipients — those who lack legal status because their parents brought them here illegally years ago.

If you ask most Republicans, it was "Much Ado About Nothing."

The lead-up and the backlash

The Jan. 9, televised bipartisan White House meeting appeared to be a significant step toward attaining something that has eluded Congress for decades — a workable immigration reform plan.

It all fell apart two days later over President Donald Trump’s alleged use of an expletive. Schumer later claimed on the Senate floor that "negotiating with President Trump is like negotiating with Jell-O."

But it turned out that Schumer was the one with the Jell-O-like qualities — he threw in the towel Monday and agreed to a continuing spending resolution to keep government open while immigration negotiations continue.

CREDO blasted the minority leader as "the worst negotiator in Washington," according to The Hill, while Charles Chamberlain, executive director of Democracy for America, accused Senate Democrats of "a stunning display of moral and political cowardice."

"Potential for momentum"?

CNN’s Brooke Baldwin asked Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., what the point of the short-lived shutdown was. Wasserman Schultz, a former Democratic National Committee (DNC) chairman, gave a novel response.

"The one thing, I would say, that [Schumer] did get is the potential for momentum,” she told Baldwin.

"Potential for momentum, potential for momentum," the CNN host repeated with disbelief. "Is that really worth shutting the government down — potential for something?”

Baldwin wasn’t the only one puzzled. National Review senior political correspondent Jim Geraghty paraphrased it like this:

"The possibility of the intangible." 

— Jim Geraghty (@jimgeraghty) January 22, 2018

And Commentary associate editor Noah Rothman observed:

"As opposed to kinetic momentum. So, in other words, an object at rest. About right."

— Noah Rothman (@NoahCRothman) January 22, 2018

But why did the Democratic Party cave? Perhaps the party of Jefferson and Jackson had found its roots. Ten short years ago their party platform provided, under the heading, "Immigration":

"We cannot continue to allow people to enter the United States undetected, undocumented, and unchecked.  . . . [T]hose who enter our country's borders illegally, and those who employ them, disrespect the rule of the law."

That was the Democratic Party’s position in 2008 — the year it selected then-Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill.,  as its presidential nominee.

Then again, maybe Schumer read this month’s Harvard-Harris poll, indicating that 81 percent of American voters want to see a reduction in immigration of all types. When’s the last time 81 percent of American voters agreed on anything?

In addition, while a vast majority of voters support amnesty for DACA recipients, 65 percent would support such a deal if it also secures the Southern border, ends chain migration and eliminates the Visa Lottery program — precisely what Trump is calling for.

Whatever the reason for the Democratic Party caving, Independent Journal Review editor Josh Billinson couldn’t help but compare the shutdown’s timing to Anthony Scaramucci’s brief 11-day tenure as White House communications director. Billinson observed:

"The government shutdown lasted roughly 0.23 Scaramucci's."

— Josh Billinson (@jbillinson) Jan. 22, 2018

The figure 0.23 Scaramuccis sounds about right. And with it we have a new standard to measure brief periods of political time – like weekend shutdowns.

Michael Dorstewitz is a retired lawyer and has been a frequent contributor to BizPac Review and Liberty Unyielding. He’s also a former U.S. Merchant Marine officer and an enthusiastic Second Amendment supporter, who can often be found honing his skills at the range. To read more of his reports — Click Here Now.

© 2022 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


MichaelDorstewitz
Maybe Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., read this month’s Harvard-Harris poll, indicating that 81 percent of American voters want to see a reduction in immigration of all types. When’s the last time 81 percent of American voters agreed on anything?
credo, democratic, lottery, schumer, visa
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2018-47-23
Tuesday, 23 January 2018 10:47 AM
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