Tags: sunburn | treatment | damage

How To Effectively Soothe a Sunburn

American flag on the beach in sun
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Wednesday, 03 July 2024 05:39 PM EDT

While at the beach, pool or picnicking on the Fourth of July weekend, it’s important to slather on sunscreen. Sunscreen can protect you against sunburn, skin cancer, and premature aging, says the American Academy of Dermatology, that offers these tips on how to correctly apply the product.

But statistics show that 1 in 3 Americans suffer from sunburn each year, raising their risk of potentially deadly skin cancer, according to  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Excessive UV exposure is responsible for over 90% of skin cancers, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

So if you do end up sunburned, it’s important to treat the burn correctly to avoid further skin damage, says USA Today. Dermatologist Lindsey Zubritsky says that sunburns take time to heal but you can speed up the process by hydrating and repairing.

Taking cool baths, and applying moisturizers that contain aloe can help, along with using ibuprofen to reduce pain. Never apply ice directly to injured skin, says Zubritsky, as this can do more harm than good. And avoid using products with benzocaine, a topical anesthetic that may further irritate the skin or cause an allergic reaction, and only exacerbates the painful situation.

According to the Mayo Clinic, a bad sunburn may take several days to heal, and any lingering changes in skin color usually disappear with time. However, see your healthcare provider if you:

• Develop large blisters.

• Develop blisters on the face, hands, or genitals.

• Have swelling of the affected area.

• Show signs of infection, such as blisters with pus or streaks.

• Experience worsening pain, headache, confusion, nausea, fever, or chills.

• Get worse despite at-home care.

• Have eye pain or vision changes.

Seek IMMEDIATE care if you experience:

• A fever over 103 degrees Fahrenheit with vomiting

• Confusion

• An infection

• Dehydration.

• Cold skin, dizziness or feeling faint.

Lynn C. Allison

Lynn C. Allison, a Newsmax health reporter, is an award-winning medical journalist and author of more than 30 self-help books.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
While at the beach, pool or picnicking on the Fourth of July weekend, it's important to slather on sunscreen. Sunscreen can protect you against sunburn, skin cancer, and premature aging, says the American Academy of Dermatology, that offers these tips on how to correctly...
sunburn, treatment, damage
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2024-39-03
Wednesday, 03 July 2024 05:39 PM
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