Tags: skin | dermatology | dairy | alcohol | coffee | fried foods

8 Foods That Damage Your Skin

fast food burger and fries are shown with a cup of orange juice
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By    |   Friday, 12 February 2021 09:54 AM

Your skin is a reflection of what you feed your body, say experts. No matter how many expensive creams or lotions you slather on your face at night, the foods you put into your body during the day have a more powerful effect on reducing the appearance of wrinkles, acne, and age spots.

Noted dermatologist Dr. Michele Green of New York City tells Eat This, Not That! that excess dairy products, sugar, fast foods, and alcohol can make your skin worse. She adds that foods rich in refined carbohydrates such as bread, cereal, white rice, noodles, and sodas have been shown to contribute to the development of acne.

Here are eight foods to avoid if you want to restore or maintain healthy, glowing skin:

  1. Fatty meat. The saturated fat in meat triggers insulin growth factor, which stimulates sex hormones that increase acne production, says Green. “The key to meat is to keep it lean,” she said.
  2. Potato chips and French fries. Fried foods should be avoided if you want to look as youthful as possible, according to Eat This, Not That! The oils used to fry these foods cause inflammation leading to aged, wrinkled skin.
  3. Bottled water. According to Allure, the BPA in water bottles is a steroid that makes your skin break out because it acts like a hormone in your body.
  4. Too much coffee. Dr. Ava Shamban, a celebrity dermatologist, tells Allure that coffee acts like a diuretic and “that won’t make skin pretty.” The expert explains that our skin cells are made of water and anytime they shrivel up, you lose that glow and plumpness. Shamban suggests drinking a glass of water for every cup of Joe you consume.
  5. Fast food. Green says that acne and skin problems are associated with the Western diet that is typically high in calories, fat, and refined carbohydrates. Fast foods like burgers, hot dogs, chicken nuggets, and milkshakes may increase your risk of developing skin disorders.
  6. Soda. Sugary drinks damage your supply of collagen, Dr. Howard Sobel, attending dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City and the founder of Sobel Skin, tells Eat This, Not That! The expert adds that sodas contain phosphates and when their levels increase, your skin shows signs of wrinkling and premature aging.
  7. Dairy products. Studies have found an association between dairy products and acne as well as other skin disorders. Some studies have found an even stronger link between skim milk and acne than other dairy products. Experts say that the suspected culprits are the growth hormones found in milk, which are meant to help calves grow, but are not meant for human adults!
  8. Alcohol. Drinking alcohol accelerates the aging process and changes the skin’s texture, says Green, because it draws liquid from the body. “Less fluid can lead to dehydration and take away moisture from the skin, contributing to dryness,” she said, according to Eat This, Not That! “This can make fine lines and wrinkles appear more pronounced.”

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Your skin is a reflection of what you feed your body, say experts. No matter how many expensive creams or lotions you slather on your face at night, the foods you put into your body during the day have a more powerful effect on reducing the appearance of wrinkles, acne, and...
skin, dermatology, dairy, alcohol, coffee, fried foods
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Friday, 12 February 2021 09:54 AM
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