Tags: Health Topics | pros | cons | telemedicine

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine

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By    |   Thursday, 25 March 2021 10:36 AM

There is no question that telemedicine is here to stay. Experts say the trend, which became a necessity at the height of the pandemic, is now a preferred option for many patients.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Managed Care, telemedicine has fast become the preferred approach over the traditional medical office visit.

The study found that both patients and healthcare practitioners enjoyed the effective follow-up and enhanced convenience of virtual video visits (VVVs) when compared to conventional medical appointments at a clinic or doctor’s office.

Surprisingly, the patients surveyed in the study found no loss of communication during VVVs, while clinicians reported that they experienced a loss of connection to their patients.

Dr. Joseph Mosquera, MD, an RxSaver medical expert and experienced integrative general practitioner in Newark, New Jersey, says there are distinct advantages and disadvantages to telehealth and telemedicine.

“The advantages include no need to take time off from work, whether it's in a home or in the field,” he tells Newsmax. “Telemedicine eliminates child or elder care issues and allows you to focus on a specific period without wasting time in a waiting room with contamination risks from others.”

Another obvious advantage is that having your medical visit from the comfort and convenience of your own home eliminates any transportation costs and the stresses of traveling, says Mosquera.

Having a preliminary visit through telemedicine with your primary care physician helps to screen the need for a specialist, he adds, which also saves time and money.

“The disadvantages include lack of human-to-human presence and contact with a more detailed examination which usually gives the doctor a much better chance at a proper diagnosis,” says the expert. “It’s also difficult to establish a deep trust in the doctor-to-patient relationship when the examination is done remotely.”

Mosquera says that non-urgent mental conditions, skin lesions, and second opinions all lend themselves to the telehealth model. Common conditions like a viral illness, sprains, headaches, and mild discomforts also can be evaluated initially via telemedicine.

However, potentially life-threatening illnesses, sudden or acute respiratory, cardiac, or neurologic symptoms are true emergencies that demand immediate in-person attention, usually in an emergency room setting, says Mosquera.

“Shortness of breath, chest pain, or sudden weakness or numbness require immediate evaluation and care,” he tells Newsmax. “Severe depression, suicidal thoughts, psychotic episodes, erratic behavior, or addiction symptoms all require emergency in-person care.”

© 2021 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
There is no question that telemedicine is here to stay. Experts say the trend, which became a necessity at the height of the pandemic, is now a preferred option for many patients. According to a study published in...
pros, cons, telemedicine
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2021-36-25
Thursday, 25 March 2021 10:36 AM
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