Tags: prebiotic | sodas | poppi | olipop | fiber

The Skinny on Prebiotic Sodas

different prebiotic sodas
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Tuesday, 06 February 2024 04:42 PM EST

Are the popular sodas that claim they contain gut-health prebiotics really good for you? While they can boost fiber in your diet, experts warn they can cause digestive distress if you struggle with digestive issues or have a gut condition like irritable bowel syndrome.

According to Study Finds, Shyla Cadogan, a registered dietitian, explains the differences between probiotics and prebiotics. Probiotics are live yeast and bacteria that can improve your gut health when consumed. Two popular examples of probiotic-rich foods are kimchi and kombucha.

Prebiotics are plant fibers that feed your gut bacteria, helping probiotics to flourish. Brands like Poppi and Olipop have prebiotic sodas that contain between two and nine grams of fiber per can. Cadogan claims that close to 95% of Americans do not meet the recommended 25 grams of daily fiber. Whole food-based fiber found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains are preferable sources of fiber, but the added fiber in these sodas can help increase your overall numbers.

Popular brands of prebiotic sodas use different fiber sources such as agave inulin, cassava root, chicory root, and Jerusalem artichoke. These forms of fiber form a gel in the digestive tract and can improve regular bowel moments and promote healthy blood sugar levels. There is also less sugar in these healthier sodas, ranging from between two to five grams per can versus regular soda which can pack up over 40 grams of sugar per can with zero grams of fiber, says Cadogan.

Prebiotic sodas may also include apple cider vinegar, says registered dietitian Amy Shapiro, which contains pectin, a fiber found in fermented apples, as well as a variety of minerals, herbs, and botanicals. Shapiro tells Health that prebiotic sodas always have fewer calories than regular sodas. A can of Coke is 150 calories while a can of Olipop is 35.

Shapiro, founder of Real Nutrition NYC, says that while fiber does help form health-boosting short-chain fatty acids in the large intestine, the processed fiber in these sodas may offer only a limited benefit. That’s because it may ferment faster than fiber from whole foods, stopping short of reaching the microbes in the large intestine.

The bottom line, according to dietitians, is that if your overall diet is filled with sugar, oil, fats, and processed foods and lacks fiber, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, protein, and healthy fats then just adding one item like a prebiotic soda won’t save the day.

And some people, like those suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, or colitis, may want to abstain from drinking these products, which can aggravate digestive conditions. Shapiro further warns that one study linked drinking several cans of prebiotic sodas containing inulin to inflammation and liver damage.

Consuming inulin fiber found in prebiotic sodas doesn’t hold a candle to eating plant-based foods,” she said. Some examples include:

• Bananas

• Apples

• Artichokes

• Flaxseed

• Garlic

• Peas and beans

• Oats

• Whole grain wheat

If you are looking for a healthier alternative to traditional sodas, try sparkling water with a slice of lemon. “Another good alternative is herbal tea,’ said Shapiro. “Herbal tea has its own flavor, along with health benefits from antioxidants.”

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Are the popular sodas that claim they contain gut-health prebiotics really good for you? While they can boost fiber in your diet, experts warn they can cause digestive distress if you struggle with digestive issues or have a gut condition like irritable bowel...
prebiotic, sodas, poppi, olipop, fiber
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2024-42-06
Tuesday, 06 February 2024 04:42 PM
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