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Tags: pollution | air | toxins | vegetables | apiaceous | celery | carrot

Eating Carrots and Celery Protects Against the Negative Effects of Pollution

carrots, celery, parsnips, parsley cut up and bagged and labeled
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Monday, 16 May 2022 04:34 PM EDT

Air pollution is major global health problem, responsible for over 4 million deaths each year. And here, in the U.S., many cities in California and major cities in other states are notorious for poor air quality and smog. But a new study published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, reveals that eating more apiaceous vegetables such as carrots, celery, parsnips and parsley, can help mitigate the negative effects of air pollution.

According to Study Finds, scientists at the University of Delaware found that eating more of this family of vegetables protects the body from acrolein accumulation. Acrolein is a hazardous substance that is a lung and skin irritant with a strong, acrid odor that is present in large quantities in both cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust.

The researchers led by Jae Kyeom Kim, an assistant professor in the College of Health Sciences’ Behavioral Health & Nutrition Program at the University of Delaware, found that apiaceous vegetables, which are high in phytonutrients, were able to mitigate the toxic effects of acrolein.

“Kim’s research discovered that apiaceous vegetables supported detoxication through an increase in antioxidant enzyme activity,” said Dr. Jillian Trabulsi, in a university news release. “The results suggest that apiaceous vegetables may provide protection against acrolein-induced damages and inflammation because in the liver, the vegetables enhance conversion of acrolein into a water-soluble acid for bodily secretion.”

Kim suggests that it takes less than two cups of vegetables daily to accomplish this detoxification, but he plans to perform human clinical trials to verify this intervention.

“When we calculated this, we determined the actual daily calorie amount of apiaceous vegetables for humans is roughly 1 and 1/3 cups per day,” said Kim. “It doesn’t require a high intake to see a difference, and this is an achievable amount in daily life.”

Kim and his team stress the importance of improving your diet to combat the buildup of toxicants found in air pollution.

“Research has identified that it is the totality of nutrients in fruits and vegetables that support beneficial health outcomes, rather than a single nutrient,” adds Trabulsi. “Focusing on a healthy whole food diet is more impactful than relying on individual supplements.”

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Health-News
Air pollution is major global health problem, responsible for over 4 million deaths each year. And here, in the U.S., many cities in California and major cities in other states are notorious for poor air quality and smog. But a new study published in The Journal of...
pollution, air, toxins, vegetables, apiaceous, celery, carrot, parsnips, protect
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2022-34-16
Monday, 16 May 2022 04:34 PM
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