Tags: Health Topics | medication | prescription | opioids

Don't Drive If You Are Taking These Medications …

Prescription drugs
Prescription drugs (Penchan Pumila/Dreamstime.com)

Monday, 29 July 2019 08:17 AM

Be careful about what medications you take before you get behind the wheel.

Most drugs won't affect your ability to drive, but some prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can cause side effects that make it unsafe to drive, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Those side effects can include: sleepiness/drowsiness, blurred vision, dizziness, slowed movement, fainting, inability to focus or pay attention, nausea, and excitability.

Some medicines can affect your driving ability for just a short time after you take them, but the effects of others can last for several hours, or even into the next day.

Some medicine labels warn to not operate heavy machinery when taking them, and this includes driving a car, the FDA said in a news release.

There are a number of types of medications — or any combination of them — that can make it dangerous to drive or operate any type of vehicle, whether it's a car, bus, train, plane or boat.

These drugs include: opioid pain relievers; prescription drugs for anxiety (for example, benzodiazepines); antiseizure drugs (antiepileptic drugs); antipsychotic drugs; some antidepressants; products that contain codeine; some cold remedies and allergy products such as antihistamines (both prescription and OTC); sleeping pills; muscle relaxants; medicines to treat or control symptoms of diarrhea or motion sickness; diet pills; "stay awake" drugs, and other medications with stimulants (such as caffeine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine).

Also, never drive when you've combined medication and alcohol, the FDA stressed.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist about medication side effects, including those that interfere with driving, and/or ask for printed information about the side effects of any new medicine.

To manage or minimize medication side effects that can affect driving, your health care provider may be able to adjust your dose, adjust the timing of when you take the medicine, or change the medicine to one that causes fewer side effects, the FDA said.

Always follow a medication's directions for use and read warnings on the packaging or on handouts provided by the pharmacy.

Tell your healthcare provider about all health products you are taking, including prescription, non-prescription and herbal products, and also about any reactions you experience.

Don't stop using a medicine unless told to do so by your doctor, the FDA said.

© HealthDay

   
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Most drugs won't affect your ability to drive, but some prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can cause side effects that make it unsafe to drive, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.
medication, prescription, opioids
371
2019-17-29
Monday, 29 July 2019 08:17 AM
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