Tags: kidney stones | summer | dehydration | diet | salt | fat | sugar

This Summer Health Risk Affects 1 in 10 Americans

woman walking outside in park with hand on back in pain
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By    |   Friday, 07 June 2024 01:44 PM EDT

Now that the warm weather has arrived, we think about health risks such as heat stroke or sunburn. But one in 10 Americans will suffer from kidney stones this summer due to dehydration and too much salt, fat, and sugar in their diet.

According to USA Today, kidney stones form when minerals in our urine crystalize into small masses or stones that can become lodged in the ureter, the tube connecting the kidney to the bladder. This can cause a painful obstruction if the stones cannot pass through.

High temperatures can increase the risk of developing these stones because people spend more time in the sun, don’t drink enough fluids, or don’t use their air conditioner. The incidences of kidney stones have been increasing over the last few decades and some experts speculate that global warming may be one of the causes.

In addition, Dr. Timothy Averch, a urologist in Columbia, South Carolina, says that diet also plays a role in the formation of stones. Processed foods are often packed with sodium and should be avoided, along with drinks that dehydrate our bodies like coffee and alcohol. Averch says that eating a diet high in animal protein leads to hypercalcemia, or too much calcium in the blood. Instead, drinking plenty of fluids and beverages that include citrate, such as lemon juice, will help prevent kidney stones.

It's fine to eat calcium-rich foods like dairy products but avoid taking calcium supplements, which can increase risk for kidney stones, say experts. The symptoms of kidney stones include a sharp pain in the lower back that travels down to the groin. Other signs include nausea, vomiting, blood in the urine, or a burning feeling while urinating.

Doctors can diagnose kidney stones with blood and urine tests, imaging, and the analysis of passed stones, says the Mayo Clinic. Treatment includes drinking several quarts of water to help pass small stones, pain relievers, or medical therapy to help relax the muscles in your ureter, making it easier to allow the stone or stones to pass. The National Kidney Foundation says you are 50% more likely to have kidneys stones if you’ve had one in the past.

If you suspect you’ve developed this condition, see a healthcare professional.

“If you’re not sure what it is and never had a kidney stone before, you should probably seek medical care,” Averch said.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Now that the warm weather has arrived, we think about health risks such as heat stroke or sunburn. But one in 10 Americans will suffer from kidney stones this summer due to dehydration and too much salt, fat, and sugar in their diet. According to USA Today, kidney stones...
kidney stones, summer, dehydration, diet, salt, fat, sugar
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2024-44-07
Friday, 07 June 2024 01:44 PM
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