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Tags: fat | milk | stroke | heart | attack

Full-Fat Milk Could Cut Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

Full-Fat Milk Could Cut Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Monday, 30 July 2018 12:43 PM EDT

Americans have been led to believe that all fat is bad for your health. In addition, we’ve been told to ditch dairy products. But now a blockbuster new study debunks both myths.

Researchers at the University of Texas’ School of Public Health studied 3,000 adults over the age of 65 and measured the levels of three fatty acids found in dairy products in their blood for 13 years. They published their findings in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

"Our findings not only support, but also significantly strengthen, the growing body of evidence which suggests dairy fat, contrary to popular belief, does not increase the risk of heart disease or overall mortality in older adults, “ said Marcie Otto, lead author and assistant professor of epidemiology, human genetics and environmental science at UT’s School of Public Health, according to Newsweek.

This new research joins other studies that showed eating higher levels of fatty acids reduced the risk of diabetes. Another study showed that women who ate full-fat products—especially fatty dairy—were less likely to gain weight while undergoing menopause. Both diabetes and obesity are leading causes of stroke and heart attack.

Otto and her team found that none of the fatty acids found in high fat dairy products were linked to a higher risk of dying. In fact, one of the fats was actually linked to a LOWER risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Researchers showed that those who had higher levels of fatty acids from dairy products had a 42 percent lower risk of dying from stroke.

Otto also pointed out that low-fat dairy products are deceiving in their health promises, as they can contain high levels of sugars, which have been previously linked to cardiovascular disease and obesity.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming the lives of 610,000 people each year. Stroke is the fifth biggest killer with over 795,000 people in the U.S. experiencing them each year.

"I believe that dairy can and should be part of an overall balanced diet,” Dr. Kevin Campbell, a leading cardiologist from North Carolina, tells Newsmax. “Eating lots of fruits and vegetables as well as lean proteins—in combination with a heart healthy lifestyle or regular exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight is the key to reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease.

"I do not believe that this study should have any real impact on how we view cardiovascular disease,” he adds. “There is no single magic bullet. Milk has its place. It’s a great source of calcium and protein as well as some fats, but again, it is only part of a well-balanced diet.”

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Americans have been led to believe that all fat is bad for your health. In addition, we've been told to ditch dairy products. But now a blockbuster new study debunks both myths. Researchers at the University of Texas' School of Public Health studied 3,000 adults over the age...
fat, milk, stroke, heart, attack
439
2018-43-30
Monday, 30 July 2018 12:43 PM
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