Tags: exercise | strength training | weightlifting | blood sugar | glucose | diabetes | depression

Weightlifting Boosts Brain Power and Memory

men and women lifting weights in a group class
(Dreasmtime)

By    |   Tuesday, 14 May 2024 02:54 PM EDT

Exercise has a surprising number of health benefits, including strengthening the heart, improved mood, reduced risk for depression, chronic diseases and brain disorders, such as Alzheimer’s. But weightlifting, in particular, can boost brain function and slow cognitive decline, according to Study Finds.

One of the reasons it works is that weight training improves the brain’s ability to process glucose, which is important for protecting against the development of Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes are 77% more likely to suffer from depression.

Long-term blood sugar changes are also associated with brain-damaging inflammation. And fluctuations in blood sugar are linked to insulin resistance, which results in brain cells not getting the energy they need to function properly.

One session of resistance training lowers both glucose and insulin levels for up to 24 hours, says Study Finds. It also reduces three-month measurements of blood sugar measurements called HbA1c in those who are at risk for developing diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness.

Studies suggest that resistance training can also prolong your life. An analysis published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that people who spent 30 to 60 minutes strength training each week had a 40% lower risk of premature death.

Multiple chemicals such as myokines are produced by the muscles when they are exercised and these benefit both the body and the brain. For example, one myokine called cathepsin B is released, enters the bloodstream and travels to the brain where it stimulates the release of brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) that helps brain cells grow and survive, as well as play a part in memory and learning.

Here are some tips on how to get started:

• Work with a trainer, if possible. Many gyms offer complimentary orientation sessions when you join.

• Start slow, working with light weights and more repetitions to build strength and stamina.

• Join classes. Working out with others can be motivating and more enjoyable than a solo session.

• Use resistance bands. These are easy to work with and very effective. Plus, you can carry them in your briefcase or suitcase when traveling because the bands take up little space.

• Make sure you consume enough protein to feed your muscles. Eating the right amount of protein at the right time during the day also helps boost brain health, says Stephen Perrine, author of the bestselling book, The Whole Body Reset. “Our bodies need 25 to 30 grams of protein at each meal to keep the process of protein synthesis cranking along,” he explains.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
Exercise has a surprising number of health benefits, including strengthening the heart, improved mood, reduced risk for depression, chronic diseases and brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's. But weightlifting, in particular, can boost brain function and slow cognitive...
exercise, strength training, weightlifting, blood sugar, glucose, diabetes, depression, memory, brain
454
2024-54-14
Tuesday, 14 May 2024 02:54 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved