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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: nocturia | sleep | diabetes | dr. oz

Are Bathroom Breaks Ruining Your Sleep?

Dr. Oz By and Wednesday, 04 August 2021 12:45 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Jennifer Aniston has acknowledged that she sleepwalks. Jimmy Kimmel talks about dealing with narcolepsy.

But you really can't find many people — celebrities or not — who are willing to talk about another, far more common sleep problem: nocturia, or having to urinate multiple times a night, chronically disrupting sleep.

Around 30% of people over age 30 experience nocturia, and that number climbs to more than 50% of folks ages 60 to 70 and 80% to 90% of those older than that.

This can happen when your body makes too much urine or can't store it for six to eight hours. It can also be triggered by drinking too much fluid (especially caffeinated drinks or alcohol) before bedtime; the timing of certain medications, including diuretics, some antibiotics, antiseizure meds, excessive vitamin D and more; or sleep apnea and insomnia.

Diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, prostate obstruction, menopause, and vaginal prolapse are also possible causes.

Because poor sleep has a cascade effect on your physical and mental health and aggravates health issues you're already dealing with, you should talk to your doctor about nocturia.

There are four ways to remedy the problem: identify and correct underlying health issues; change your behavior (like cutting down on how much you drink in the two hours before bedtime); change the time of day you take some medications; and take medication to treat an overactive bladder.

If you and your doctor work together to find a solution, you'll sleep better sleep and have a more energetic, enjoyable tomorrow.   

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Because poor sleep has a cascade effect on your physical and mental health and aggravates health issues you're already dealing with, you should talk to your doctor about nocturia.
nocturia, sleep, diabetes, dr. oz
252
2021-45-04
Wednesday, 04 August 2021 12:45 PM
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