Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: travel | heart disease | oxygen | echocardiogram

Is Travel Safe for People With Heart Disease?

By Wednesday, 28 April 2021 04:38 PM Current | Bio | Archive

In most cases, people with heart disease are perfectly capable of extended travel. However, they should definitely see their doctor before going on a trip of significant length or distance — especially if they’ll be gone for an extended time or are headed out of the country. (In some underdeveloped countries, medical care may be substandard.)

This is especially true for people who have recently suffered a heart attack, been hospitalized for a cardiac reason, or who have undergone heart surgery or a stenting procedure. Before embarking, get a stress test, an echocardiogram, and standard bloodwork.

In addition, traveling to elevations of 2,500 feet or more above sea level can put added strain on your heart. Because the air is thinner, you breathe less oxygen, and the heart must work harder to supply oxygen to the body. This can cause symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, and fatigue, even in healthy people.

If you’ve had a recent heart issue, talk to your doctor. And even if your heart condition is well-controlled, going to very high elevations may require additional precautions.

If you begin to feel unwell at any elevation, you may need to go lower, or use supplemental oxygen.

In particular, if you have severe heart failure, uncontrolled very high blood pressure, or you’ve recently had a heart attack, surgery, or a stent inserted, discuss your plans with your cardiologist to learn what elevation is safe for you.

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Dr-Crandall
If you’ve had a recent heart issue, talk to your doctor. And even if your heart condition is well-controlled, going to very high elevations may require additional precautions.
travel, heart disease, oxygen, echocardiogram
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2021-38-28
Wednesday, 28 April 2021 04:38 PM
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