Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: heart disease | pregnancy | cardiomyopathy

New Heart Test for Pregnant Women

By Tuesday, 16 March 2021 04:42 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Because heart disease accounts for 26.5 percent of pregnancy-related deaths, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has created new guidelines on screening, diagnosis, and management of heart disease.

During pregnancy, the cardiovascular system undergoes major changes to sustain “tremendous increases in blood volume,” said Dr. James Martin, chairman of ACOG’s pregnancy and heart disease task force. “That’s why it is critical to identify the risk factors beforehand.”

A heart muscle disease called peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death in expectant mothers, accounting for 23 percent of deaths late in pregnancy.

Common risk factors for maternal death due to heart disease include age, high blood pressure during pregnancy, and obesity.

But the leading factor is race. The risk of death from heart disease is 3.4 times higher among black women than white women.

All pregnant women and new mothers should be assessed for heart disease using a tool known as the Cardiovascular Disease Toolkit algorithm, which was developed from research that found about 9 in 10 pregnant women and new moms who died of heart disease would have been identified as high risk had this new screening algorithm been used.

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Dr-Crandall
A heart muscle disease called peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of death in expectant mothers, accounting for 23 percent of deaths late in pregnancy.
heart disease, pregnancy, cardiomyopathy
193
2021-42-16
Tuesday, 16 March 2021 04:42 PM
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