Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: Cancer | Heart Disease | High Blood Pressure | breast cancer | Trastuzumab | Herceptin | heart

Breast Cancer Drug Linked to Heart Failure

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Wednesday, 12 December 2018 04:42 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Older breast cancer patients treated with the drug Herceptin may be more prone to heart failure, according to a new study by the Yale School of Medicine.

In a report published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the Yale researchers noted that heart failure is a relatively common complication in older women with breast cancer.

But their analysis of more than 45,000 Medicare patients with early-stage breast cancer found those taking Herceptin — also known as Trastuzumab — were even more likely to suffer the heart condition.

Previous studies involving younger, healthier breast cancer patients have shown Herceptin improves survival, but can increase heart complications, especially when combined with a frequently used therapy called anthracycline chemotherapy.

The Yale study found that Herceptin was associated with a 14 percent higher rate of heart failure or cardiomyopathy in patients over three years, compared to those who did not receive the drug or chemo.

What’s more, patients given both Herceptin and anthracycline had a 23.8 percent higher rate.

“Further study is needed to fully understand the benefits and risks of trastuzamab when they are used in the real-world population,” said Cary Gross, a co-researcher on the study.

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Older breast cancer patients treated with the drug Herceptin may be more prone to heart failure, according to a new study by the Yale School of Medicine.In a report published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the Yale researchers noted that heart failure...
breast cancer, Trastuzumab, Herceptin, heart, failure
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2018-42-12
Wednesday, 12 December 2018 04:42 PM
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