Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: aspirin | pancreas | cancer | diabetes

Aspirin Cuts Pancreatic Cancer Risk

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Tuesday, 09 April 2019 04:43 PM Current | Bio | Archive

According to one study, men and women who take low-dose aspirin regularly cut their risk of developing pancreatic cancer by nearly half: 49 percent.

Not only that, but the longer a person takes aspirin, the greater the risk reduction.

Protection against pancreatic cancer ranged from a 60 percent risk reduction for those who took aspirin for more than 10 years to a 39 percent reduction for those who took it six years or less, researchers said.

The study was conducted in 30 hospitals in Connecticut between 2005 and 2009.

Researchers contrasted the aspirin-taking habits of 362 people with pancreatic cancer with 690 healthy people in a control group.

Other factors, including obesity, smoking, and diabetes history were taken into account.

This study adds to the evidence that aspirin therapy could become an important tool in cancer prevention.

Research has already found that aspirin helps protect against colorectal cancer. Now we can add a potential benefit against pancreatic cancer — which is one of the deadliest.

I recommend patients take one low-dose (81 mg) aspirin daily. For people over 50 who do not have heart disease, my recommendation is to take the same dose a few times a week, a regimen that will still offer protection while minimizing any potential adverse side effects.

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According to one study, men and women who take low-dose aspirin regularly cut their risk of developing pancreatic cancer by nearly half: 49 percent.
aspirin, pancreas, cancer, diabetes
211
2019-43-09
Tuesday, 09 April 2019 04:43 PM
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