Tags: Health Topics | vaccines | children | schools

5 Kinds of Vaccines

By    |   Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 11:21 PM

Vaccination is a heated topic in today’s healthcare discourse. In California, lawmakers are considering requiring vaccination for schoolchildren despite parents’ philosophical beliefs, while many parents are raising concerns about vaccination safety.

Vaccination requirements have always been determined by the individual state. Most allow exemptions for medical and religious reasons, and most states require the same kinds of vaccines for schoolchildren. Adults also may have required vaccines that are mandated by some places of employment.

VOTE NOW: Should Parents Have the Freedom Not to Vaccinate Their Children?

Here are the five vaccines required for children by most states:

1. DTaP/Tdap
DTap and Tdap are both vaccines that address diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. DTaP is given in a series of five doses for children younger than 7. A single dose of Tdap is suggested for anyone older than 11, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

2. Polio
The polio vaccine requires four doses in children between 2 months and 6 years of age. The CDC reported that America has been polio free for 30 years, but due to its highly contagious nature, everyone should still be vaccinated. Worldwide, the CDC said there were 407 cases in 2013.

3. MMR/MMRV
Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox) are highly recommended vaccines for children and are required by most schools. Typically, the two vaccines are separated. Children will receive one dose of MMR between 12 and 15 months, and another between 4 and 6 years old. At the same time, they will also receive doses, in separate injections, for chickenpox, the CDC said.

URGENT:
Should the Government Be Allowed to Mandate Vaccinations?

However, children can get two doses of one shot, MMRV, instead that protects against all four diseases. The CDC warns that MMRV has a higher risk of fevers compared to getting MMR and chickenpox vaccines separately.

4. Hepatitis B
Typically children are given all three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine before the age of 2. Hepatitis B, unlike other vaccinated diseases, is still rampant in America, infecting about 38,000 people in 2009, according to the CDC.

Furthermore, hepatitis B creates long-term health issues and damage to the liver.

5. Hib
Hib stands for Haemophilus influenza type b, which is a disease that usually affects young children. It was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis before the vaccinations became widespread. The CDC recommends four doses of the vaccine be given before the child is two years old.

VOTE NOW: Should Vaccinations for Children Be the Parents' Decision?

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Vaccination is a heated topic in today's healthcare discourse. In California, lawmakers are considering requiring vaccination for schoolchildren despite parents' philosophical beliefs, while many parents are raising concerns about vaccination safety.
vaccines, children, schools
417
2015-21-03
Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 11:21 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved