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Vaccines: CDC-Recommended Immunization Schedule From Birth to 18 Years

By    |   Wednesday, 27 May 2015 04:34 PM

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regularly publishes and updates a recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 18. The CDC is the prominent U.S. public health organization that releases guidelines, news, and tips on a variety of health and safety concerns.

The immunizations listed on the CDC’s childhood schedule are explained below:

Hepatitis B (HepB) Vaccine
The Hepatitis B vaccine is given in three doses. The first is typically administered to newborns upon discharge. The second is recommended between 1-2 months of age, and the third should be administered between a child’s first 6-18 months. Hepatitis B is a viral liver infection spread through bodily fluids.

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Rotavirus (RV) Vaccine
The RV Vaccine is administered in 2-3 doses during infants first 2-6 months. Rotavirus is the leading cause of diarrhea in infants and children and can be spread through contaminated food, water, hard surfaces, and hands.

Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP) Vaccine
The DTaP vaccine should be given to children in five doses. The first three doses are given in the first 2-6 months of age, the second during the child’s 15-18th months, and the third between the ages of 4-6 years.

The DTaP vaccine prevents the bacterial diseases diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough. Diphtheria and pertussis is spread through coughing and sneezing and tetanus is contracted from contaminated soil.

Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Acellular Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine
The Tdap vaccine is a follow-up to the DTaP vaccination given between the ages of 11-12 years.

Haemophilus Influenzae (Hib)
The Hib vaccine is administered in 3-4 doses between the ages of 2-15 months. The Hib vaccine prevents a bacterial disease that causes pneumonia and life-threatening blood infections.

Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13) and Polysaccharide (PPSV23)
The PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccines are separate vaccines given in 3-4 doses between the ages of 2-18 months. These vaccines prevent pneumococcal diseases including meningitis and blood infections.

Inactivated Poliovirus (IPV)
The IPV vaccine is given in 4 doses starting at age two months and ending between 4-6 years of age. The vaccine prevents polio, which is a viral disease contracted through the mouth that leads to paralysis and/or meningitis.

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Influenza (IIV, LAIV)

The IIV and LAIV are two vaccines administered annually from the six months of age onward to prevent the seasonal flu. The vaccine is better known as a flu shot.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

The MMR vaccine is provided in one dose between 12-15 months of age and in a second dose between 4-6 years of age. Measles, mumps, and rubella are potentially life-threatening viral diseases that lead to a variety of symptoms including coughing, fever, inflammation of the brain, meningitis, pneumonia, and encephalitis.

Varicella (VAR)
The VAR vaccine is typically administered with the MMR vaccine and prevents chickenpox.

Hepatitis A (HepA)
The HepA vaccine is provided in two doses between 12-23 months of age. Hepatitis A is a liver disease typically contracted from contaminated food or water.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV2 or HPV4)
HPV2 is administered to females while HPV4 is given to both females and males. They are administered in three does between the ages of 11-12 years to prevent cervical cancer in females and other anogenital cancers in both males and females.

Meningococcal Conjugates

Meningococcal conjugate vaccines are recommended in one does between 11-12 years and in a following booster dose around the age of 16. These vaccines protect against Meningitis B, C, and Y.

VOTE NOW: Should Vaccinations for Children Be the Parents' Decision?

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regularly publishes and updates a recommended immunization schedule for persons aged 0 through 18. The CDC is the prominent U.S. public health organization that releases guidelines, news, and tips on a variety of health and safety concerns.
vaccines, immunization schedule
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2015-34-27
Wednesday, 27 May 2015 04:34 PM
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