Tags: Vaccines | vaccination | exemption | Alaska

Which Vaccination Exemptions Are Allowed by Alaska?

By    |   Monday, 20 Jul 2015 06:38 PM

Children entering school in Alaska can receive exemptions from vaccination requirements for religious or medical reasons. However, the state does not allow exemptions from immunizations on philosophical grounds for personal or moral beliefs, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Some religions forbid their congregations from getting vaccinations because they conflict with the tenets and practices of the religious beliefs. Medical exemptions may occur because a particular child could risk serious side effects from vaccinations because of allergies or specific diseases.

VOTE NOW: Should Parents Have the Freedom Not to Vaccinate Their Children?

The immunization requirements in Alaska pertain to public, religious, or private schools.

Medical exemptions from immunization can include a statement signed by a doctor or advanced nurse practitioner licensed in the state and presented to health authorities. The statement must explain that vaccinations would be harmful to the health of the child or members of the child’s household.

Parents or guardians who don’t want a child immunized for religious reasons must sign an affidavit stating that vaccinations conflict with the tenets or practices of the church or religious denomination, according to the National Vaccine Information Center.

Children entering public or private school in Alaska usually must be immunized against measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, tetanus, polio, pertussis, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B.

Homeschooled children are not considered private school students in Alaska, so they aren’t required to receive immunizations unless later entering schools, according to the Coalition for Responsible Home Education. Vaccinations are required if the child is homeschooled through the state’s correspondence school programs.

Children in child care facilities where medical services are not available on a weekly basis can be exempted from vaccinations on a temporary basis. The child can attend the facility until obtaining evidence or certification of immunization, but it can be no longer than 60 days.

State laws in Alaska allow for discretion on the part of health and social service officials. As with other states, Alaska takes into consideration the possibility of outbreaks or epidemics affecting the general public in a specific area. This could require children attending school within certain school districts be immunized against diseases specified by health and social officials.

URGENT: Should States Be Allowed to Make Health Decisions for Your Children?

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Children entering school in Alaska can receive exemptions from vaccination requirements for religious or medical reasons. However, the state does not allow exemptions from immunizations on philosophical grounds for personal or moral beliefs.
vaccination, exemption, Alaska
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2015-38-20
Monday, 20 Jul 2015 06:38 PM
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