Tags: Gun Control | North Carolina | hunting | invasive

Hunting in North Carolina: 4 Invasive Species to North Carolina and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Thursday, 28 May 2015 02:56 PM

To protect local ecosystems, North Carolina laws allow for hunting of invasive species. An invasive species is considered dangerous to a region because it was brought in from another region and has proved destructive to the local ecosystem. Invasive species can spread disease, destroy crops and land, or kill off native species in the area.

Here is a look at some invasive species in North Carolina.

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1. Feral Swine

These animals were brought to the United States from Europe for private game hunting in North Carolina, but they escaped and bred, spreading across the state. The feral swine destroy crops and property as they dig for food. They also pose a significant health risk for domestic swine and other wildlife. Because of these dangers, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission allows hunters to take them year-round with no closed season.

2. Coyotes

North Carolina encourages hunting coyotes in much of the state, and there is no closed season or bag limit to taking these animals, except in five counties where coyote hunting is prohibited. Much like feral swine, coyotes are a year-round, day-or-night hunt. The coyote is an invasive species that appeared in North Carolina in the 1980s. They are opportunistic feeders that often appear in suburban areas.

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3. European Starlings

The European starling was brought to North America by a man who wanted to spread the romance of William Shakespeare's beloved birds to the states. However, the starling is a destructive bird that attacks and slaughters native bird colonies and has been labeled an invasive species. They are unprotected, and under the laws of hunting in North Carolina, they can be shot at any time.

4. Red Foxes

There are two types of foxes found in North Carolina, but only the gray fox is native to the state. The red fox is considered to be an invasive species. There are 27 different fox hunting seasons and 22 fox trapping seasons, and the same rules apply for gray and red foxes. The full listing of the different seasons based on counties can be found on the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission website.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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To protect local ecosystems, North Carolina laws allow for hunting of invasive species. An invasive species is considered dangerous to a region because it was brought in from another region and has proved destructive to the local ecosystem.
North Carolina, hunting, invasive
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2015-56-28
Thursday, 28 May 2015 02:56 PM
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