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Report: US Medicine Headed for a Huge Shortage of Doctors

Report: US Medicine Headed for a Huge Shortage of Doctors

Doctors and other medical professionals gather to protest against Congress' and President Barack Obama's health care reform efforts during a rally at the U.S. Capitol September 10, 2009 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) 

By    |   Sunday, 19 August 2018 03:03 PM

With young people becoming less interested in pursuing the costly and youth consuming medical field – and current doctors deciding to seek other career paths – the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects a growing shortage of doctors, NBC News reported.

"After 20 years, I quit medicine and none of my colleagues were surprised," Dr. Amy Baxter told NBC News. "In fact, they all said they wish they could do the same.

"I began to feel like an easily replaceable cog in the healthcare machine. With the [enforcement] of EHRs [electronic health records], I had to spend more time as a scribe. One night a child I was treating had a seizure, and I couldn’t get the medicine to enable them to breathe because their chart wasn't in the system yet. This kid was fixing to die and I, the doctor, couldn't get the medicine. It was demoralizing."

New York University has announced it will offer free tuition to all medical school students in an effort to encourage more doctors to select lower-paying specialities, according to the report.

The AAMC projects a shortage of between 42,600 and 121,300 physicians by 2030, a total that is almost 2,000 and 16,000 higher than projections released in 2017, NBC News reported.

More young people are seeking the big dollar professions in engineering vs. medicine, according to The Medicus Firm's regional VP Craig Fowler.

"There are definitely fewer people going to [med school] and more going into careers like engineering," Fowler told NBC News.

Fowler's firm helps attract doctors seeking residency to less desirable locales away from metropolitan areas, where millennials want to be. Also, he seeks to help find residency opportunities for recent graduates before they give up and go into another profession.

"Graduating med school doesn't mean you'll get into a residency," Fowler said. "There aren't enough residency slots for medical grads. So, you have that population of people who have an MD but didn't practice for that reason. There is this bottleneck effect."

Also, for those already in the profession, the pros are less and less outweighing the cons of a demanding career.

"It has gotten worse for all of us, unfortunately — whether you work in the hospital or in the outpatient setting, we are burdened more by non-medical business or insurance professionals without any medical training," Dr. Nicole Swiner said. "It's disheartening. I have transitioned to more part-time clinical work [so as to focus more on] speaking, writing and consulting.

"Become a full-time consultant, author, speaker, entrepreneur, baker, cheerleader — whatever. Just be happy. Life's too short."

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With young people becoming less interested in pursuing the costly and youth consuming medical field - and current doctors deciding to seek other career paths - the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) projects a growing shortage of doctors, NBC News...
doctor, shortage, u.s., coming
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2018-03-19
Sunday, 19 August 2018 03:03 PM
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