Tags: monster | star | merger | astronomers | collision

Monster Star Merger: Collision Could Birth Behemoth Mega-Star

By    |   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2014 02:45 PM

Astronomers in Spain have observed twin monster stars that are so close together that researchers expect them to merge into a single, jumbo-sized star in the near future.

On a tight orbit, the two stars — known as MY Camelopardalis — appear to eclipse one another nearly every day, National Geographic reported. The huge stars are 38 and 32 times the mass of our sun and are so close together that their outer atmospheres are probably already touching.

Located in a star cluster called Alicante 1 about 13,000 lightyears from Earth, the twin stars are expected to merge "quickly and quite explosively," and may explain how extremely massive stars are born, National Geographic said. Such a merger has never been observed before. The stars are thought to be no more than 2 million years old, considered young for a star.

MY Camelopardalis can be seen with binoculars or telescopes in the constellation Camelopardalis (the Giraffe) at the end of the hind legs.

The research conducted at the Centre of Astrobiology in the University of Alicante, Spain, was reported recently in the the journal of Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Twitter users seemed fascinated by the research.






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Astronomers in Spain have observed twin monster stars that are so close together that researchers expect them to merge into a single, jumbo-sized star in the near future.
monster, star, merger, astronomers, collision
259
2014-45-10
Wednesday, 10 Dec 2014 02:45 PM
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