Tags: mistook | doughnuts | meth | orlando

Mistook Doughnuts for Meth: Arrest Leads to Lawsuit, Settlement

Image: Mistook Doughnuts for Meth: Arrest Leads to Lawsuit, Settlement
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By    |   Monday, 16 October 2017 02:10 PM

Orlando Police mistook glaze from doughnuts for meth in 2015 and now a former city employee is $37,500 richer because of the mistake, the Orlando Sentinel reported.

Daniel Rushing, who is retired from the City of Orlando Parks Department, was pulled over for not coming to a complete stop after leaving a 7-Eleven convenience store, the newspaper noted.

The Miami Herald reported that police were conducting a drug stakeout when they stopped Rushing.

Police charged that field tests indicated that white flakes found on the floor of his vehicle were an illegal substance, the Sentinel said. Police took Rushing to jail on a charge of possession of methamphetamine and a firearm charge, and he spent 10 hours there before posting $2,500 bond, the newspaper stated.

But a second test done by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement found that the substance was sugar from the glaze of Krispy Kreme doughnuts, the Orlando Sentinel reported.

Rushing sued the city and received $37,500 in a settlement, the Sentinel reported.

The Orlando police officer who conducted the original field test and wrote the arrest report, Cpl. Shelby Riggs-Hopkins, was reprimanded, the Sentinel said. Orlando police then trained more than 730 officers on how to properly use its field test kits.

The department concluded that Riggs-Hopkins made a false arrest, which violated department policy, but had not acted with malice. The Sentinel reported in February that she left the police department on Jan. 22, about a week after she was given a written reprimand for making a false arrest.

Despite the $37,500 check that came earlier this month, Rushing told the Sentinel he is still hoping to get the incident expunged from his record.

"I haven’t been able to work," Rushing told the newspaper. "People go online and see that you’ve been arrested."

A New York Times magazine investigation in the field test kits used by police in 2016 found that there are established error rates for the devices "because their accuracy varies so widely depending on who is using them and how. Data from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement lab system show that 21 percent of evidence that the police listed as methamphetamine after identifying it was not methamphetamine, and half of those false positives were not any kind of illegal drug at all."

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Orlando Police mistook glaze from doughnuts for meth in 2015 and now a former city employee is $37,500 richer because of the mistake, the Orlando Sentinel reported.
mistook, doughnuts, meth, orlando
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2017-10-16
Monday, 16 October 2017 02:10 PM
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