Tags: hollywood | inequality | report | inclusion

Hollywood Inequality: Report Shows No Progress on Inclusion

Image: Hollywood Inequality: Report Shows No Progress on Inclusion

Mark Rylance, winner of Best Supporting Actor for "Bridge of Spies," Brie Larson, winner of Best Actress for "Room," Leonardo DiCaprio, winner of Best Actor for "The Revenant," and Alicia Vikander, winner of Best Supporting Actress for "The Danish Girl," pose during the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Loews Hollywood Hotel on Feb. 28, 2016, in Hollywood, California. (Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 07 Sep 2016 04:06 PM

A new report calls Hollywood the "epicenter of cultural inequality," where minority, women, and LGBT actors are underutilized and don't get proper recognition for their work.

The report by the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism found that women made up a "mere 31.4 percent of the 4,370 speaking or named characters in the top 100 grossing films last year despite making up more than half of the population."

The report also shows that 49 of those 100 films didn’t have an Asian or Asian-American character with a speaking or named role, 17 of the films had no black actors in them, 45 of the films had no representation from people with disabilities, and a staggering 82 films lacked any representation from lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender characters.

“While the voices calling for change have escalated in number and volume, there is little evidence that this has transformed the movies that we see and the people hired to create them. Our reports demonstrate that the problems are pervasive and systematic,” Dr. Stacy L. Smith, one of the study’s authors, said in a statement.

Earlier this year, Hollywood and the public alike rallied around the hashtag "OscarsSoWhite" after certain films, such as the highly regarded biopic "Straight Outta Compton," and actors of color were overlooked for nominations and awards.

In 2015, inequality in Hollywood became a discussion piece after director Ava DuVernay missed an opportunity to become the first black woman to be nominated for Best Director at the Oscars. That missed opportunity came after DuVernay directed “Selma,” an invigorating civil rights drama that was discussed as a strong contender for Best Picture.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
A new report calls Hollywood the epicenter of cultural inequality, where minority, women, and LGBT actors are underutilized and don't get proper recognition for their work.
hollywood, inequality, report, inclusion
276
2016-06-07
Wednesday, 07 Sep 2016 04:06 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved