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Forgotten Dr. Seuss Stories Get New Life in Upcoming Collection

By    |   Thursday, 31 Jul 2014 09:15 PM

Four Dr. Seuss stories that have largely been forgotten will be offered this fall by Random House as a new collection called "Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories."

Publishers Weekly doesn’t give the stories, meant for 4- to 8-year-olds, rave reviews but credits them for being part of Theodor Seuss Geisel's development in writing children’s books more than 60 years ago.

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“By no means gems, these archives suggest how Geisel tinkered with characters, developed his signature tetrameter, and commented on ethical issues, circa 1950,” the PW review said.

Originally appearing in editions of Redbook magazine in the 1950s, “Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories” will be released in illustrated form in September. The stories that were printed in Redbook didn’t have pictures with them.

“Horton and the Kwuggerbug,” which came out in 1951, tells the story of Horton, the elephant, who helps an insect-type creature get to the top of a mountain and a Beezlenut tree. In “Marco Comes Late,” printed in 1950, the main character has to explain to his teacher why he is more than two hours late for school.

"How Officer Pat Saved the Whole Town" was printed in 1950 and tells the story of a police officer who keeps disaster from striking several people along the fictional Mulberry Street, which plays prominently in many of Seuss’ early stories. “The Hoobub and the Grinch” was printed in 1955 and is only 32 lines long. It shows an earlier version of the well-known Grinch trying to get a Hoobub to buy a green piece of string for 98 cents.

The four stories will have an introduction written by Charles D. Cohen, an expert on Seuss’ work who calls the stories "fresh encounters with old friends and familiar places," according to USA Today.

Seuss’ earliest work, “And to Think that I Saw it on Mulberry Street,” came out in 1937 after being rejected 29 times, according to Library Spot. It was followed by 46 books for children.

Dr. Seuss was born in 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts, and died at the age of 87 in 1991.

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Four Dr. Seuss stories that have largely been forgotten will be offered this fall by Random House as a new collection called "Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories."
dr seuss, stories, new, collection
379
2014-15-31
Thursday, 31 Jul 2014 09:15 PM
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