×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Skip to main content
Tags: brazilian | wasp | venom | cancer | cure

Brazilian Wasp Venom: Is It the New Cancer Fighter?

Brazilian Wasp Venom: Is It the New Cancer Fighter?
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 03 September 2015 09:08 AM EDT

Brazilian wasp venom can be turned into a cancer fighter, researchers are suggesting in a new study released Tuesday in the science publication Biophysical Journal.

Polybia paulista is an aggressive wasp mostly found in southeastern Brazil and its toxic venom is used to attack prey and defend itself, according to BBC News. Scientists said in the Biophysical Journal study that the venom contains the toxin MP1, which has been shown to target and destroy cancer cells in tests on mice.

Scientists from the study said MP1 appears to attack fat molecules that are found on the surface of cancer cells, creating large holes that allow the molecules needed for cell function to leak out. Since the fat molecules on healthy cells are located inside, MP1 should avoid attacking them.

"This could be useful in developing new combination therapies, where multiple drugs are used simultaneously to treat a cancer by attacking different parts of the cancer cells at the same time," said Dr. Paul Beales, the study's co-author from the University of Leeds.

Beales told BBC News that the treatment using MP1 would become an entirely new class of anti-cancer drugs.

Co-author Dr. João Neto, from São Paulo State University in Brazil, said that MP1's destructive attacks on cancer cells happens quickly and kills the cells' chances to survive.

"Formed in only seconds, these large pores are big enough to allow critical molecules such as RNA and proteins to easily escape cells," Neto said of MP1, according to The Guardian.

Laboratory tests have reportedly shown that the toxin was effective in suppressing the growth of prostate and bladder cancer cells, along with leukemia cells that had been resistant to other drugs.

"Until a decade ago, Polybia paulista wasn't well known to anyone other than entomologists and the hapless people it stung in its native Brazil," PBS Nova Now's Tim De Chant wrote, calling MP1 possibly the "ideal chemotherapy."

"But then, a number of research groups discovered a series of remarkable qualities all concentrated in the aggressive wasp's venom," he added.

© 2023 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


TheWire
Brazilian wasp venom can be turned into a cancer fighter, researchers are suggesting in a new study released Tuesday in the science publication Biophysical Journal.
brazilian, wasp, venom, cancer, cure
343
2015-08-03
Thursday, 03 September 2015 09:08 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
TOP

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Download the NewsmaxTV App
Get the NewsmaxTV App for iOS Get the NewsmaxTV App for Android Scan QR code to get the NewsmaxTV App
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved