Tags: War on Terrorism | New York Times | Seymour Hersh | Osama bin Laden | Obama administration

NYTimes Correspondent Backs Hersh's Account of Bin Laden Killing

Image: NYTimes Correspondent Backs Hersh's Account of Bin Laden Killing
Journalist Seymour Hersh. (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 13 May 2015 12:21 PM

Another voice has joined the chorus of those who say that Seymour Hersh's account of the demise of Osama bin Laden is more accurate than the claims of the Obama administration: New York Times foreign correspondent Carlotta Gall.

Hersh asserted in a lengthy exposé that the Obama administration inaccurately took full credit for the killing of Osama bin Laden and that the Pakistani government played a significant role in his capture.

Gall has said that she had gleaned from her sources that Pakistan's intelligence service had kept bin Laden prisoner since 2006, and that the CIA learned about his location from a Pakistani informer who sold the information for $25 million.

"On this count, my own reporting tracks with Hersh's," Gall wrote.

Hersh, quoting a single, unnamed source in his article, said that the Pakistani government had known the whereabouts of bin Laden and had an active role in approving and implementing the raid in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where bin Laden died.

The source also told Hersh that the CIA and United States learned about bin Laden's location after paying a former senior Pakistani intelligence officer a $25 million reward for the information.

Two intelligence sources subsequently corroborated Hersh's account with NBC News.

The Obama administration's version claimed that the Pakistani government had no involvement, was unaware of the attack in advance, and that bin Laden had been tracked down through his couriers, not through the reward.

Gall said she heard the same story about the informer "circulating in the rumor mill" in the days after the raid, but it was too difficult to corroborate without any documentary evidence.

Two years later, as Gall was researching her book, "The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan," she wrote that she "learned from a high-level member of the Pakistani intelligence service that the ISI had been hiding bin Laden and ran a desk specifically to handle him as an intelligence asset."

"This development is hugely important — it is the strongest indication to date that the Pakistani military knew of bin Laden's whereabouts and that it was complicit in hiding a man charged with international terrorism and on the United Nations sanctions list," Gall wrote.

For his part, Hersh has defended his account.

He told CNN on Monday, "I've been around a long time … and I understand the consequences of what I'm saying."

The administration has strongly rebutted Hersh's report.

On Monday, Pentagon spokesman Col. Steve Warren said Hersh's piece was "largely a fabrication" and that there were "too many inaccuracies" to detail each one, NBC reported.

Warren said the raid to kill bin Laden was a "unilateral action."

Both the National Security Council (NSC) and the Pentagon denied that Pakistan had played any role in the raid.

"The notion that the operation that killed Osama bin Laden was anything but a unilateral U.S. mission is patently false," said NSC spokesman Ned Price. "As we said at the time, knowledge of this operation was confined to a very small circle of senior U.S. officials."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
Another voice has joined the chorus of those who say that Seymour Hersh's account of the demise of Osama bin Laden is more accurate than the claims of the Obama administration: New York Times foreign correspondent Carlotta Gall.
New York Times, Seymour Hersh, Osama bin Laden, Obama administration
500
2015-21-13
Wednesday, 13 May 2015 12:21 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved