Tags: loretta lynch | criminals | walk | National Review Online | attorney general | confirmation hearings

National Review Online: Attorney General Lynch Let Criminals Go Free

By    |   Monday, 19 Jan 2015 10:41 PM

U.S. Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch allegedly let criminals walk free in exchange for their cooperation, did nothing when they committed further crimes, and kept the victims of those crimes in the dark — all while she was head of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New York, National Review Online reports.

The website cites the April 2013 testimony of former judge Paul Cassell, who urged the House Judiciary Committee to investigate the New York office for its handling of a stock-fraud case.

Cassell didn't mention Lynch, but alleged her office didn't comply with laws that require federal prosecutors to notify victims of criminal proceedings so they could collect millions in restitution, National Review Online reports.

"Lynch — in order to get scalps — makes special deals with informants," lawyer Richard Lerner told National Review Online. He's currently in a legal fight with Lynch’s office over the case.

Lerner is up against the Justice Department on behalf of his client and fellow lawyer Frederick Oberlander, who represents those suing the government for knowing of informant Felix Sater's past crimes and letting him walk anyway, National Review Online reports.

The Supreme Court recently denied Oberlander’s petition to force the release of the sealed records from the case, but he claims Lynch's office helped cover up Sater's crimes — before and during Lynch’s two stints in charge — in exchange for his cooperation.

"The complaints regarding the sealing of the materials in this case have already been litigated on no fewer than three prior occasions, and they have consistently been rejected," a Department of Justice spokesman told National Review Online.

Cassell, however, said the case "has what I would call a 'business as usual' feel to it, which leads me to think this is not a one-off, idiosyncratic kind of thing," National Review Online reports.

"It clearly looks like there's the potential for this to be going on in a lot of other cases, and the problem of course is that since these cases are sealed, there's no way for the victims to find out what’s happening, there’s no way for Congress to monitor how often this is being used."

Louisiana Republican Sen. David Vitter, a member of the Judiciary Committee that will vet Lynch’s nomination, thinks Lynch could be a worrisome choice, National Review Online reports.

His spokesman, Luke Bolar, told National Review Online that Vitter is also raising questions about why she tried to block the release of flood-insurance documents in another case, documents he describes as "likely revealing widespread fraud perpetrated against victims of Superstorm Sandy."

Former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell told National Review Online that Lynch's office behavior in the Sater case compares with how Attorney General Eric Holder’s office mishandled the Fast and Furious scandal.

"If they have literally been licensing people to go back on the street and commit additional crimes, she certainly should not be attorney general; she shouldn’t even be U.S. attorney," Powell told National Review Online. "That practice needs to be stopped."

CBS News reports Lynch will face a two-day confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee beginning Jan. 28.

She's already already met with 45 senators and will have met with every member of the Judiciary Committee before her confirmation hearing.

She's expected to be asked questions about issues she'll have to manage as the nation's chief of law enforcement — the threat of lone wolf terrorists, cyberattacks, use of force by police, and bank prosecutions.

And her past will be fair game as well, CBS News reports.

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Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch allegedly let criminals walk free in exchange for their cooperation, did nothing when they committed more crimes, and kept the victims of those crimes in the dark, all while she was head of the U.S. Attorney's Office in New York,...
loretta lynch, criminals, walk, National Review Online, attorney general, confirmation hearings
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Monday, 19 Jan 2015 10:41 PM
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