Tags: schindlers | list | warsaw | museum

'Schindler's List' Movie Archive to Go to Warsaw Museum

By    |   Thursday, 24 Oct 2013 06:28 AM

JERUSALEM — Dozens of boxes of research materials used in the making of the 1993 blockbuster movie "Schindler's List" are being moved to Warsaw's Museum of the History of Polish Jews, from their repository at the University of California, in order to be preserved in digital form, the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported.
 
Spielberg's archive, collected over six years, contains the testimonies of 52,000 interviewees. They document the dreadful conditions endured not only Jews but also Roma, homosexuals, and other Hitler opponents.
 
While most of Poland's 3.5 million Jews were exterminated during the Holocaust, some survived and tried to rebuild their lives in the country. Many of these were subsequently forced out in 1968 by the communist regime of Wladislaw Gomulka. Their stories, too, are included in the collection, according to Haaretz.
 
In researching the movie, which was filmed in Krakow, Spielberg spoke with numerous Holocaust survivors. Believing his materials were of historical value, he had them transferred to the University of Southern California's Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education.
 
In Warsaw, the voluminous archives will first be categorized so that the most historically noteworthy testimonies can be digitized first. The project could take well over a decade to complete.
 
The California-based Taube Foundation for Jewish Life and Culture, founded by businessman Tad Taube, donated the computer servers that will store the newly-digitized testimonies.
 
Taube has been involved in a variety of projects to preserve the 1,000 year-old legacy of Polish Jewry.
 
Schindler was a Catholic, German-speaking, entrepreneur. During World War II, as the Nazis systematically murdered European Jews, Schindler inexplicably developed an all-consuming desire to rescue as many as possible, initially by establishing a mini-labor camp within his own Nazi-authorized factory near Krakow.

All in all, he rescued about 1,100.
 
Schindler died in 1974 and is buried in Jerusalem. Archival material connected to Schindler also is maintained at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem.
 
 
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Dozens of boxes of research materials used in the making of the movie "Schindler's List" are being moved to Warsaw's Museum of the History of Polish Jews, from their repository at the University of California, in order to be preserved in digital form, the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported.
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2013-28-24
Thursday, 24 Oct 2013 06:28 AM
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