Tags: pope francis | drugs | mexico | catholics

Pope's Comments Linking Drugs, Satan Angering Mexican Catholics

Pope's Comments Linking Drugs, Satan Angering Mexican Catholics
(Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

By    |   Friday, 20 March 2015 12:22 PM

The rest of the world may love Pope Francis, but Mexicans are furious that he is using their country as his reference point for drug violence and blaming the country's woes on punishment from Satan.

The Mexican government was first to be offended by the pope after he sent an email to a lawmaker in his native Argentina, reports Global Post, in which he said he hopes "we are in time to stop Mexicanization."

The pontiff, in the Feb. 21 message, was commenting on how his homeland as suffered from rising drug violence, and noted that while he was "talking to Mexican bishops," he found the problem is a "question of terror."

Mexico's Foreign Secretary Jose Antonio Meade complained to the Vatican that the pope was "stigmatizing" Mexico, and that he wanted to express his country's "sadness and concern."

The Vatican replied that it meant no offense over the phrasing, and the matter seemed to have blown over, at least until March 12, when the Pope told Mexico's largest television network, Televisa, that drug violence was the devil's way of punishing Mexico.

"I think that the devil is punishing Mexico with great fury," Francis said. "The devil does not forgive Mexico because she [the Virgin Mary] showed her son there. That is my interpretation."

After that statement came out, Mexican Catholics were outraged, as the nation believes it has a special relationship with the church as the second-largest Catholic nation in the world.

"I believe in the church. But I think that saying that people have died because of some spiritual punishment is not very respectful to the suffering families," said Hector Cruz, a 52-year-old engineer, commented to Global Post.

Cartel violence has killed more than 83,000 people since 2007, including students and children, and newspaper columnists also questioned the pope's words.

"Evil exists, without doubt, and its representation is Satan, the devil," Raul Rodriguez wrote in El Grafico. "But in this case, it is necessary to point the finger at corruption, criminals infiltrating the government, poverty, hunger, ideological confrontation and inequality as some of the causes of the explosion [of violence]."

Religious anthropologist Elio Masferrer said there are also many Mexicans who agree with the pope, who took the name Francis after the saint of the poor. He noted that the pope has been very supportive with victims of violence.

Further, Rev. Hugo Valdemar, spokesman for the archdiocese of Mexico City, said the pope was stating the church's position on scripture that "states clearly that the devil is behind evil acts. This is in line with Catholic thinking and one shouldn’t make a scandal out of it."

But Mexican Catholics say they feel a special link with the Vatican, which supported them after the Mexican Revolution. They were devoted to Pope John Paul II, who attracted crowds of millions. Francis' predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, visited Mexico just once, in 2012.

"There was a deep affection in Mexico for John Paul II, and those are hard shoes to fill," Valdemar said. "But Pope Francis can still win the hearts of the Mexican people."

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Newsfront
The rest of the world may love Pope Francis, but Mexicans are furious that he is using their country as his reference point for drug violence and blaming the country's woes on punishment from Satan.
pope francis, drugs, mexico, catholics
516
2015-22-20
Friday, 20 March 2015 12:22 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved