Tags: nobel chemistry

American, Two Japanese Win Nobel in Chemistry

Wednesday, 06 Oct 2010 08:56 AM


An American and two Japanese scientists have won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing "one of the most sophisticated" tools used in organic chemistry.

Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki of Japan, and American Richard Heck developed the process called palladium-catalyzed cross coupling. It enables chemists to better join carbon atoms to create complex molecules.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awards the chemistry prize, said the tool has "vastly improved" the ability of scientists to make sophisticated chemicals.

It said the process is used worldwide in the production of pharmaceuticals, as well as molecules used in the electronics industry.

The three winners will share a $1.5 million award.

On Monday, the Nobel committee awarded British scientist Robert Edwards this year's Nobel Prize in medicine for his work in developing in-vitro fertilization.

Russian scientists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov won the physics prize Tuesday for "groundbreaking" experiments with a strong and highly conductive form of carbon.

The prize for literature and the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced this week. The final prize, for economics, will be awarded October 11.

Swedish dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel created the prizes, which were first awarded in 1901 in accordance with his will.



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