Tags: tanzania | press | freedom

Report Spotlights Grim State of Tanzanian Press Freedom

By    |   Wednesday, 07 Aug 2013 08:22 AM

The Committee to Project Journalists (CPJ) says a rise in attacks against the press in Tanzania is sowing fear and self-censorship among the media. The group says it has documented 10 attacks over the past year, including the killing of a veteran cameraman by police.
 
CPJ consultant Tom Rhodes, author of a new report called “The Invisible Plight of the Tanzanian Press,” says the country’s relatively positive international image does not reflect reality when it comes to protecting press freedom.

“Tanzania routinely gets a positive report card both on press freedom indexes and good governance indexes and others. And you know we’ve had the recent visit from President Obama last month,” Rhodes told the Voice of America. ”And yet we’ve seen this trend of deteriorating press freedom conditions on two fronts. We’ve seen [an] increasing number of attacks and threats against the press.”
 
Rhodes said this “is coupled with a whole series, a whole arsenal of anti-press laws” — some of which have been in place since Tanzanian independence nearly a half century ago.

Several extraordinarily brutal attacks on the press have occurred in the past year.
 
In September, veteran reporter and cameraman Daudi Mwangosi was killed by police officers while covering an opposition rally in southern Tanzania. He was shot during an altercation with police over the arrest of another journalist, Rhodes said.
 
While one junior officer was arrested and charged with murder, “there were many others documented by video evidence, who are also involved and implicated, and they didn’t face any problem,” according to Rhodes.

Another targeted journalist was Absalom Kibanda, chairman of an editors’ forum, who was attacked, kidnapped, and tortured in March. Rhodes said two assailants cut off the top of Kibanda’s right ring finger; pierced his left eye and pried out several teeth and fingernails. He is back in Tanzania after receiving medical treatment in South Africa.
 
No one has been brought to justice in the Kibanda case.

“We’re starting actually to see some cracks within the system, within the ruling party, which has been in power since independence. And I don’t think they’re used to the criticism or the dissent within the public,” Rhodes said. “This is always the case, not only in Tanzania, but other countries as well — once the ruling party feels that its hold on power is weakened, they start cracking down on the press.”

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Africa
The Committee to Project Journalists (CPJ) says a rise in attacks against the press in Tanzania is sowing fear and self-censorship among the media. The group says it has documented 10 attacks over the past year, including the killing of a veteran cameraman by police.
tanzania,press,freedom
394
2013-22-07
Wednesday, 07 Aug 2013 08:22 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved