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Texas Lawmakers File Bills Opposing UN Green Initiative

By    |   Friday, 27 Feb 2015 02:59 PM

Last week, two Texas state lawmakers introduced bills aimed at preventing state and local governments from participating in a nonbinding plan to address climate change and sustainable development adopted by the United Nations in 1992, which they believe infringes on the rights of American citizens.

The identical bills proposed last week by state Rep. Molly White and state Sen. Bob Hall  would bar state and municipal funding to organizations accredited by the United Nations to implement a policy that originated in the Agenda 21 plan.

White's bill would prevent a governmental entity from entering into "an agreement or contract with, accept money from, or grant money or other financial aid to a nongovernmental or intergovernmental organization accredited by the United Nations to implement a policy that originated in the Agenda 21 plan adopted by members of the United Nations at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in June 1992."

Agenda 21 was adopted at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Brazil for the purposes of serving as a blueprint for the protection of the planet and sustainable development, according to a UN backgrounder.

According to the UN, the long-term goal of the plan to "move the world away from its present unsustainable model of economic growth towards activities that will protect and renew the environmental resources."

But Agenda 21 went beyond simply addressing concerns about the environment, expanding its purview to other issues, such as "patterns of development which cause stress to the environment" like poverty and external debt.

While Agenda 21 covers a broad range of issues, the legislation aimed at defunding groups implementing its goals is equally broad, which some say could lead to unforeseen consequences.

"You’re talking about a document that covers everything from healthy living, preventing child abuse, promoting public transportation," Chris Whatley, executive director of the United Nations Association of the United States of America, told The Washington Post.

"If you specifically write a really big bill that says the state of Texas can’t work with any of those organizations and it can’t work with anything that’s included in that document, that 350-page set of suggestions, it could lead you into territory you don’t anticipate," he added.

The Texas lawmakers, as well as other state legislators outside of the Lone Star state, have concerns that the UN could overstep its authority.

The Montana State House this week rejected a similar bill, reports the Great Falls Tribune.

In debate held earlier this week in the Montana House Judiciary Committee, former Madison County Commissioner Dan Happel bluntly stated his reason for supporting the legislation, KPAX.com reported.

"It outlines a socialist plan for a sustainable world in the 21st century. Livestock production and most meat consumption will be eliminated. It will be a vegetarian world. Privately owned vehicles and personal travel will be eliminated," he testified.

The bill's sponsor, Randall Pinoocci, expressed his concerns that Agenda 21 would give federal authorities leeway to infringe on individual property rights.

"FEMA has proclaimed the entire town of Sun River in the floodplain. I cannot build on my property. No one can. I can't put a sewer system in," Pinnocci said.

According to The Washington Post, Mississippi has passed a similar bill, which is now pending in the state Senate, and Maine and Washington State are considering measures of their own.

In 2013, the Missouri legislature passed a bill aimed at stopping implementation of Agenda 21, but it was vetoed by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon.

"It is fundamentally misguided and unnecessary to require local government officials to become international law experts in order to perform their duties," Gov. Nixon said in his official veto statement. "The premise of Senate Bill 265, to the extent it is discernible, is wrong and the solution it puts forth is worse."

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Last week, two Texas state lawmakers introduced bills aimed at preventing state and local governments from participating in a nonbinding plan to address climate change and sustainable development adopted by the United Nations in 1992.
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2015-59-27
Friday, 27 Feb 2015 02:59 PM
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