Tags: Health Topics | low income | wealthy | health | physical activity

Survey: Lower-income Homes Are Less Physically Active

Survey: Lower-income Homes Are Less Physically Active
(Dominic Lipinski/AP)

By    |   Friday, 03 November 2017 09:04 PM

People in lower-income homes are less likely to be physically active than those in wealthier households, a new survey found.

The Sports & Fitness Industry Association's "2017 Tracking The Fitness Movement" report found that 33.4 percent of individuals in household's making between $25,000 and $49,999 annually were inactive, compared with 18.3 percent of those in homes making more than $100,000.

"That's jarring because sports should not be dependent on household income, in a moral and philosophical level for sure, but also on a practical level," SFIA President and CEO Tom Cove said, Forbes reported.

"Inactivity has been a sticky problem. We have identified that a number of people are totally inactive for a number of years. As we have delved deeper in the last two years we have found greater texture to where the problem is. It should not be that way in terms of household income."

According to Cove, two factors are at play: the reduction of physical education classes and the increased competition level of youth sports driving out the less talented children, Forbes reported.

"We have to provide more opportunities for more people, especially for kids to be active and not be super star athletes," Cove said.

"If we let that [super stars] become the norm, we've done a great disservice. We should be providing regular, local, accessible, less competitive, seasonal opportunities across the board in fitness activities."

The increased specialization of and competitiveness of youth sports is also driving up the price, Forbes noted, citing a 2016 Utah State Survey that showed the average family spends almost $3,000 per year on sports — with the maximum spending close to $20,000.

Some low-income families could be spending nearly 10 percent of their annual incomes on their children's sports, the report found.

The study reported the percentage of inactivity among low income households contrasts with the growth in health club memberships, which continues to grow by about 1 million each year since 2012.

"The sports industry has been challenged. The resilience of the fitness industry is impressive," Cove said, Forbes reported. "The [fitness] industry, as opposed team sports, just keeps coming up with new stuff."

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People in lower-income homes are less likely to be physically active those those in wealthier households, a new survey found.
low income, wealthy, health, physical activity
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2017-04-03
Friday, 03 November 2017 09:04 PM
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