Tags: David Letterman | TV | show | liberal | Al Franken | audience | politicians

Most Interpret David Letterman as a Liberal

Image: Most Interpret David Letterman as a Liberal
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By    |   Thursday, 21 May 2015 04:49 PM

Politicians have paraded onto his late-night television show for 33 years, but it was often tough to figure out on which side of the aisle David Letterman might sit.

The host, who broadcast his last "The Late Show With David Letterman" show on CBS on Wednesday, confessed to Howard Stern earlier this year he'd never voted Republican, and the conservative Media Research Center and Mediaite both have proclaimed him a liberal.

The Washington Post also reports Letterman donated money to Minnesota Democratic Sen. Al Franken in both his 2008 primary and general election, and to a super PAC supporting Franken in 2014, when he won a second term.

The Post noted, however, Franken is a former "Saturday Night Live" comedian and friend of Letterman.

"He was definitely a liberal, although more aggressive than many at poking at both sides …" Bill Kenyon, the political director of the Republican media firm Strategic Perception, tells the Post. "He was without question one of the greats."

Yet, Hillary Clinton confidant Howard Wolfson told the Post he couldn't figure which side of the political fence Letterman stood.

"I always found him very substantive in his political interviews," Wolfson told the newspaper. "I didn't really detect an ideology," adding Letterman was "pretty tough" on Bill Clinton in 1999 and 2000 "until [Hillary] appeared on the show. "

MSNBC host Chris Matthews said Letterman appeared to take his cue from late-night TV legend Johnny Carson, who, he said, "never talked politics."

"Nobody could read his politics like we can't read Letterman's. I don't know what Letterman's politics are," Matthews told the Post.

Letterman declared himself to be a registered independent during an interview with Regis Philbin, who was guest-hosting the now-canceled "Piers Morgan Live" show on CNN, the Post reports.

"It may appear to people that we have a slant one way or the other," Letterman says, the Post writes. "But if a guy straps his dog to the roof of his car or the guy gets a shoe thrown at him this is where the material is going to be."

The Post notes the first reference is to Mitt Romney, the second to George W. Bush.

"A case could be made we are leaning [more to] one side than the other, but it's not driven by anything other than who's easier to make fun of," Letterman said.

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Politicians have paraded onto his late-night television show for 33 years, but it was often tough to figure out on which side of the aisle David Letterman might sit.
David Letterman, TV, show, liberal, Al Franken, audience, politicians
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2015-49-21
Thursday, 21 May 2015 04:49 PM
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