Tags: Abortion | women | Kansas | Arizona

In Ariz. and Ark., Women to Be Told Drug-Induced Abortion Can Be Reversed

By    |   Wednesday, 08 Apr 2015 08:23 AM

Republican Govs. Asa Hutchinson in Arkansas and Doug Ducey in Arizona have signed laws that require physicians to tell women who are undergoing drug-induced abortions that the procedure can be reversed, The Washington Post reported.

Two-stage pharmaceutical abortions are generally employed for first trimester terminations.

The protocol calls for a dose of mifepristone followed a few days later by misoprostol. Together the procedure induces contractions so that the embryo is expelled.

The Arkansas and Arizona laws are intended to give a woman the chance to change her mind even after a pharmaceutical abortion has begun.

Anti-abortion activists report that a heavy dose of progesterone can reverse the effects of the first drug, enabling the pregnancy to proceed.

"At this point, it has been reported that 80 babies have been born following the abortion-reversal process, with another 60 or so on the way (still in utero)," Mailee Smith of Americans United for Life, wrote in the National Review.

The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, however, said that it does not recommend the reversal procedure and that in 30 percent to 50 percent of cases it does not work, according to the Post.

Abortion up to about 24 weeks into pregnancy has been constitutionally protected since 1973 by Supreme Court decisions. Some states have passed laws intended to make termination of pregnancies more cumbersome for both medical providers and patients, the Post reported.

Meanwhile, Kansas has enacted a bill banning the "dilation and evacuation," or D and E, procedure that physicians commonly use in second-trimester abortions, The New York Times reported.

The law signed by Republican Gov. Sam Brownback outlaws "knowingly dismembering a living unborn child and extracting such unborn child one piece at a time from the uterus."

Similar bills are in various stages of the legislative process in Oklahoma, Missouri, South Carolina and South Dakota.

Abortion rights advocates said that Kansas now has the most restrictions on terminations of unwanted pregnancies. "We call it the 'physician intimidation and criminalization act,'" said Julie Burkhart of the Trust Women Foundation in Kansas. "This is unconstitutional."

Most abortions take place within 12 weeks of conception using methods that would not be affected by the Kansas law. About 9 percent of abortions in the state could be impacted, the Times said.

Physicians say that to comply with the law they might be forced to use in late-term abortions techniques that might be less safe – like killing the fetus with a drug before doing the D and E.

The Kansas law does not exempt cases in which the fetus is grossly deformed, and it makes no allowances for a pregnancy that is the result rape or incest. The only exception is when abortion is necessary to save a woman's life or to prevent irreversible impairment of a major bodily function, the Times reported.

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Republican governors Asa Hutchinson in Arkansas and Doug Ducey in Arizona have signed laws that require physicians to tell women who are undergoing drug-induced abortions that the procedure can be reversed, The Washington Post reported.
Abortion, women, Kansas, Arizona
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2015-23-08
Wednesday, 08 Apr 2015 08:23 AM
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