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Tags: Joe Biden | democrats | liberal

3 Reasons Democrats Will Be Even More Liberal Than Now in 2023

a road sign reading socialism ahead and in front of an american flag
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Tom Del Beccaro By Tuesday, 30 November 2021 11:17 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Led by the likes of U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and animated by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., the Democratic Party continues to move ever farther Left.

Although many are predicting that the Democrats will lose the House of Representatives and the Senate because of their out-of-touch and failed policies, that won’t stop the Democrats from moving even farther Left in 2023.

Here are three reasons why:

1.) Democrats are in control of the House and Senate by the barest of margins. Even so, they are pushing the biggest spending bills of all time and other harmful policies. Their reasoning is simple.

As I have written elsewhere, the Democrats of today "emphasize permanent government programs over short-term election victories." They know election victories come and go but government programs last forever. They also believe that more government spending results in more people being dependent on government, which they believe increases their chances for future victory. While that is an important reason why Democrats have been moving Left for decades and will continue to do so in 2023, there are three other reasons why Democrats will move even farther Left in 2023.

As the stakes rise in politics, the middle tends to disappear. Historically, the less intense the issue or disagreement, the greater the chance it can be resolved.

That's true in our own lives as well as in politics.

As the stakes grow, however, the middle tends to disappear and political parties become more partisan and demand greater discipline from their members on key votes. I refer to that as the "Escalating Partisanship Dynamic' in my book "The Divided Era."

So, at the start of the American Revolution, almost three months after hostilities started between the Colonists and English with the "shot heard round the world," key moderating figures like Ben Franklin and John Dickinson led an effort to reconcile with King George in the form of the "Olive Branch Petition."

When the Petition was rejected by King George, those more in favor of Independence, such as Alexander Hamilton, pushed for action. Eventually, month-by-month, as the stakes rose with actions and reactions, the political middle receded and Revolution ensued.

A similar dynamic occurred in the run-up to the Civil War.

Today, it is not the time of Bill Clinton who once declared "that the era of big government is over." The higher stakes today take the form of trillions of dollars in spending.

The federal budget has nearly doubled in the last 13 years. Even so, the D.C. Democrats want trillions more spent. Most of their members have taken the party line on that spending.

The manner in which they treat the few holdouts, like Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema demonstrates how high the stakes have become and how small the number of centrist Democrats exist today. You can expect even more of that in 2023 as spending rises.

2.) Swing District Democrats will lose in 2022. Almost always, the party of the White House loses seats during the first Midterm Election. The Democrats of 2022 most certainly will be subject to that general rule.

Many believe, including me, they will lose a historic number of seats because of the unpopularity of President Biden, the bad state of the U.S. economy, the dire border crises and our foreign policy weakness.

So, which Democrats will lose their seats?

The answer is not those in deep Blue areas.

It's the swing district Democrats – those who most likely would moderate some of their voting habits – who will lose their seats.

Thus, the most liberal Democrats will hold onto their seats and, by process of elimination, will make up a greater percentage of the elected Democrats in the House and the Senate in 2023.

That alone means the Democrats, as a party, will be more liberal in 2023 than today.

3.) There is no turning back for Democrats. So, who will be the voice of the diminished Democrats? Well, it is likely that Nancy Pelosi will retire when the Democrats lose the House in 2022. Chuck Schumer may well stay their Senate leader.

For the remainder, the voices of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Rep. Ocasio-Cortez, will only grow. They will claim, as they are today, that the Democrats were not liberal enough.

Given that a "Majority of Democratic voters now prefer socialism to capitalism," Sanders and AOC will continue to find a supportive audience.

Moreover, once socialism or socialist policies infect a political party, there is no turning back for that party. Read the history of British Labor Party on that issue or the end of the Roman Republic.

All of which brings us to the conclusion that the Democrats will be more liberal in 2023 than they are today — much to the danger of this country.

Tom Del Beccaro is an acclaimed author, speaker, and national columnist. As a radio and television commentator. Tom is the Chairman of carevival.com. Read Tom Del Beccaro's Reports — More Here.

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TomDelBeccaro
Led by the likes of Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and animated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Democrat Party continues to move ever farther Left.
democrats, liberal
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2021-17-30
Tuesday, 30 November 2021 11:17 AM
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