Tags: snapchat dysmorphia | selfie | filter | plastic surgery

'Snapchat Dysmorphia': People Seeking Plastic Surgery to Look Like Their Filtered Selfies

'Snapchat Dysmorphia': People Seeking Plastic Surgery to Look Like Their Filtered Selfies
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Wednesday, 08 August 2018 12:18 PM

“Snapchat dysmorphia” is on the rise, with more and more people seeking surgery to look like their filtered selfies posted to social media, according to a new study published in a journal of the American Medical Society.

Several years ago, high-end photo editing tools were used predominantly in the publishing business by professional technicians and the practice often came under fire for setting unattainable beauty standards by touching up – or, photoshopping – images of models and celebrities.

Now almost anyone with a smartphone can take a pic of themselves and even drastically enhance their selfies before posting them online, sending to friends or whatever. Hundreds of simple photo editing apps are freely available.

The problem is that these enhanced photos are creating false beauty ideals and leading to esteem issues, often seen in plastic surgery consultations where patients are seeking treatment and using photos of their filtered selfies as reference, Dazed said in reporting on the study in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery Viewpoint.

According to researchers from Boston University School of Medicine's Department of Dermatology, who wrote the study, 55 percent of surgeons reported seeing patients who requested surgery to improve their appearance according to their filtered selfies – a phenomenon for which they coined the phrase “Snapchat dysmorphia.” Snapchat is one of the more popular photo-sharing apps.

That’s a dramatic increase from just 2015, when 42 percent of patients used filtered selfies as a reference point for surgeons.

Compounding the issue, not just for plastic surgeons but for friends who do a doubletake when they see the plain old you, is that more people are touching up their photos than ever before.

In fact, up to 68 percent of adults are performing some kind of photo editing before sharing them online, FStoppers reported.

The researchers pointed out that the pervasiveness of filtered images can dent a person’s self-esteem to the point where they begin to feel inadequate.

Ultimately, this can trigger a condition known as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which is an excessive preoccupation with a perceived flaw in appearance and falls within the obsessive-compulsive spectrum.

Plastic surgery numbers are already up in the U.S., with new data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons showing continued growth in cosmetic procedures, and the selfie phenomenon will continue to fuel its growth.

According to the annual plastic surgery procedural statistics, there were 17.5 million surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures performed in 2017, marking a 2 percent increase over 2016.

On a global scale, $10.7 billion was spent last year on materials and chemicals used in cosmetic procedures worldwide.

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“Snapchat dysmorphia” is on the rise, with more and more people seeking surgery to look like their filtered selfies posted to social media, according to a new study published in a journal of the American Medical Society.
snapchat dysmorphia, selfie, filter, plastic surgery
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2018-18-08
Wednesday, 08 August 2018 12:18 PM
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