Tags: shipwreck | short sands | Noreaster

Shipwreck at Short Sands Beach Uncovered Again by Nor'easter

Image: Shipwreck at Short Sands Beach Uncovered Again by Nor'easter

A shipwreck's remains were exposed after a nor'easter battered Maine's coast over the weekend. (Deb Cram/Portsmouth Herald via AP)

By    |   Tuesday, 06 March 2018 06:29 AM

A shipwreck at Short Sands Beach in Maine, believed to dte back more than 160 years, was uncovered again by the nor'easter that battered the coast over the weekend.

The skeleton of the shipwreck was in plain view on the beach at York on Monday after the storm passed, the Portland Press Herald reported. The shipwreck was first seen in the 1950s, then again in 2007 and 2013 after strong storms cleared its grave of sand.

The Maine Historic Preservation Commission has dated the shipwreck from 1750 to 1850 based on the 51-foot-long haul, which is believed to be from a late Colonial or early post-Colonial sloop, the Press Herald said.

Leith Smith, preservationist with the Maine Historic Preservation Commission, told the newspaper that shipwrecks typically are left where they lie because moving and preserving them is expensive and only limited information can be gathered from the effort.

"Chances are it was wrecked during a big storm, and the hull got buried in the sand, and there was no way they could refloat it, so it just got dismantled," Smith told the Boston Globe. "There are quite a number of shipwrecks up and down the coast. They're definitely interesting.”

York Police Chief Douglas Bracy told the Globe that efforts are made to make sure the shipwreck's remains aren't disturbed.

"We usually try to rebury it to protect and preserve it — we move the beach back over it," Bracy told the Globe. "It's usually 6 or 7 feet below the surface."

Eileen Sewall, program coordinator for the Museums of Old York, told the Press Herald in 2013 that even though York has a well-record history of shipwrecks in the area, little is known locally about the wreck at Short Sands.

A nor'easter first uncovered the Short Sands Beach shipwreck in April 1958 when the storm washed away about four feet of sand around it, the Press Herald reported. Some first believed that it could have been a Viking ship or possibly a sailing vessel with a pointed, or pinched, stern that was common along the Maine coast in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Smith told the Globe that the historical commission determined that some of the wood from the ship was balsam fir, yellow birch, beech, red pine, and white oak.

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A shipwreck at Short Sands Beach in Maine, believed to dte back more than 160 years, was uncovered again by the nor'easter that battered the coast over the weekend.
shipwreck, short sands, Noreaster
382
2018-29-06
Tuesday, 06 March 2018 06:29 AM
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