Tags: scotus | seattle | minimum wage | fifteen dollars

SCOTUS: Seattle Minimum Wage Challenge Won't Be Heard, $15 Plan Stands

Image: SCOTUS: Seattle Minimum Wage Challenge Won't Be Heard, $15 Plan Stands
In this April 1, 2015, file photo, students and other supporters protest on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, in support of raising the minimum wage for campus workers to $15 an hour. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

By    |   Tuesday, 03 May 2016 09:19 AM

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge to Seattle’s minimum wage law, which is set to raise the hourly rate to $15.

The law took effect last year, requiring businesses with more than 500 employees to meet the $15 requirement by 2018. Smaller businesses have until 2021 to raise their minimum pay to that amount.

The International Franchise Association and businesses argued that local franchises of big companies like McDonald's and Burger King should be included in that grace period, Reuters reported.

"Seattle's ordinance is blatantly discriminatory and affirmatively harms hard-working franchise small business owners every day since it has gone into effect," said the group's president, Robert Cresanti.

Seattle has about 600 local franchise businesses employing about 19,000 workers. The law considers them to be large businesses because they are part of large networks that offer advantages, but the businesses claim to be small businesses and that those advantages come at a cost.

Working Washington, a coalition that worked to get the law passed, cheered the Supreme Court’s decision.

"The big business lobby has thrown everything they got at Seattle workers," the group said, "but they keep on losing, and the economy continues to boom."

Other cities and states have followed Seattle in enacting similar minimum wage laws, and Monday’s action could affect legal challenges to those laws.

"The Supreme Court's action makes clear that the courts are not going to step in to block the raises that America's workers need," said Paul Sonn, general counsel and program director of the National Employment Law Project, according to The Associated Press.

Matt Haller, a spokesman of the International Franchise Association, said the organization has stopped similar measures affecting franchises from being included in other minimum wage laws.

"The record of other cities rejecting this type of approach speaks equally loud, if not louder, than the non-decision that was made today by the court," Haller to the AP.

The Supreme Court hears only about 70 cases a year, and has added only seven cases to its docket since the February death of Justice Antonin Scalia, The Wall Street Journal noted, adding that those cases have been lower-profile and don’t involve major ideological issues.

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a challenge to Seattle’s minimum wage law, which is set to raise the hourly rate to $15.
scotus, seattle, minimum wage, fifteen dollars
369
2016-19-03
Tuesday, 03 May 2016 09:19 AM
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