Tags: queen nefertiti | egypt | tomb | king tut

Queen Nefertiti's Remains May Be Inside Secret Portal in King Tut's Grave

Image: Queen Nefertiti's Remains May Be Inside Secret Portal in King Tut's Grave
The bust of Egyptian beauty Queen Nefertiti is on display at Neues Museum on September 10, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. The bust is a 3400-year-old painted limestone bust of Nefertiti, the Great Royal wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaton and is one of the most copied works of ancient Egypt. (Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 12 Aug 2015 08:49 AM

Queen Nefertiti, the legendary queen of Egypt, may have a tomb hidden inside where King Tut is buried, a University of Arizona researcher recently found.

King Tutankhamun's tomb was found 1922 but archaeologist Nicholas Reeves, who said he believes Nefertiti's remains may be somewhere inside the tomb, pointing to a recent discovery of a possible portal found in Tut's resting place, the BBC News reported.

"I have been testing the evidence ever since, looking for indications that what I thought I was seeing was, in fact, not there," Reeves told the BBC in a story posted Monday. "But the more I looked, the more information I found that I seemed to be looking at something pretty real."

The possible portal was found last year after Factum Arte, a Spanish artistic and preservation specialist, was commissioned to do scans of Tutankhamun tomb, according to the BBC News. The scans were then used to reproduce a facsimile of the tomb near the site.

Reeves said in February that he spotted markings that appeared to be a spot where two doorways used to be.

"If I'm wrong, I'm wrong," Reeves said at the time. "But if I'm right, the prospects are frankly staggering. The world will have become a much more interesting place — at least for Egyptologists."

Nefertiti ruled as queen of Egypt and wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten during the 14th century B.C. The couple founded the cult of Aten, the sun god, and promoted Egyptian artwork that was different from their predecessors. Nefertiti's bust remains one of the most identifiable symbols of early Egypt.

King Tut's tomb has four rooms, but it is smaller than the ones built for other pharaohs, according to The Washington Post.

Archaeologist Howard Carter found the tomb in 1922 with thousands of priceless treasures because it was hidden away from potential grave robbers.

The newspaper wrote that King Tut likely ruled for only nine years after taking the crown as a boy, but his remains revealed that he was frail and had a club foot, possibly caused by royal inbreeding.

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Queen Nefertiti, the legendary queen of Egypt, may have a tomb hidden inside where King Tut is buried, a University of Arizona researcher recently found.
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Wednesday, 12 Aug 2015 08:49 AM
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